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Summary:

Another day brings another subsidized netbook to the U.S. This time it’s LG with their X120, which has seen sights around the rest of the world for a while now. The X120 is your basic Intel Atom powered netbook with a 160 GB hard drive, 1 […]

lg-x120-netbook

Another day brings another subsidized netbook to the U.S. This time it’s LG with their X120, which has seen sights around the rest of the world for a while now. The X120 is your basic Intel Atom powered netbook with a 160 GB hard drive, 1 GB of RAM and Microsoft Windows XP. LG expects the six-cell battery to last for seven hours. Along with Wi-Fi, the 2.8 pound X120 includes an HSPA radio tuned to AT&T’s 3G frequencies, making it a perfect candidate for a data plan. That’s exactly what you’ll need, too — a $60 monthly data plan — to grab the X120 for $179.99 at your local Radio Shack.

LG also integrated Splashtop’s instant on solution for quick access to key applications an a connected browser. A dedicated “SmartOn” button boots the netbook into a basic Linux partition, making you productive in five seconds. When I last chatted with the DeviceVM folks — creators of Splashtop – nearly a year ago, they were still working on getting their product to work with 3G connections like the one included with the X120. I expect they have that ironed out now, but I’ll ping them directly to verify. As nice as a five-second boot time is, I’d want to use the browser wherever I am.

  1. Does it have any local programs, or just “all web apps”?

    If it has local apps, can you install add-ons? The things I’d care most about are pidgin, remote desktop viewer, and a terminal viewer. I assume it already has firefox, and cli utils (vi, etc.).

    Is there anything strictly necessary in the XP partition (AT&T activation program? firmware updater?)? I mean, could I remove it in favor of giving more data space to the Linux-Splashtop OS? Or use it for Ubuntu and/or Android-x86? Especially if Ubuntu and the Splashtop OS could share data partitions…

    (anyone know how well Android-x86 supports it?)

    I just wish it was a convertible tablet format … with a linux based splashtop/instant-on OS, that I can use for IM, Web browsing, VNC, and basic local note taking … and that I could boot to Ubuntu or Android as I desire/see-fit, that would be outstanding.

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    1. It has local programs installed, but only a few. I last had a hands-on back in January, so I could be wrong, but I believe it came with a browser, chat program, audio player, photo viewer and Skype. AFAIK, you can’t officially install additional apps to the environment.

      You’re going down the path I mentioned a few months back when talking about Phoenix Hyperspace — a similar approach to Splashtop. Back then I said that with the addition of a few more key apps and some customization options, these fast-boot solutions could take the place of a full OS for some. :)

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