1 Comment

Summary:

Roughly 30,000 users subscribe the Wall Street Journal Kindle Edition, *Dow Jones* head Les Hinton told the Paley Center conference Rafat is…

WSJ Kindle

Roughly 30,000 users subscribe the Wall Street Journal Kindle Edition, *Dow Jones* head Les Hinton told the Paley Center conference Rafat is attending this morning — great for a “primitive device.”

Put that way, it suggests the potential for a nice income as devices get more sophisticated and and more models with quick delivery are in use. But how much is it worth now to Dow Jones?

At the current $15 a month, the WSJ Kindle subscriptions represent about $5.4 million annually. But it’s not that easy: the subscription price and the revenue split with Amazon (NSDQ: AMZN) shifted earlier this year; the price increased 50 percent from $10 while Amazon’s share of the take dropped. (The issue with customer relationships, a pet peeve of Rupert Murdoch, didn’t change: Amazon still controls the finances and the names.) I’m told that roughly half of the subscribers are still at the previous rate. That would put the current overall revenue at about $4.5 million, with Dow Jones (NYSE: NWS) getting less than half that. Incremental, yes, and it will continue to be. But it also should continue to grow.

The hardest bit to decipher at this point is how many people are giving up print or WSJ.com subscriptions for e-readers and, now, the new mobile subscription.

You’re subscribed! If you like, you can update your settings

  1. Martin Langeveld Thursday, November 19, 2009

    This means the New York Times has at least "roughly 30,000" as well, since it ranks #1 (WSJ is #2), on Amazon's list of newspapers available on Kindle in "bestselling" order. NYT last reported a number of 10,000 around this time last year.

Comments have been disabled for this post