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Summary:

Rumors have been swirling for days about the possible delivery of a beta version of Google’s much-discussed Chrome OS this week, as we noted last Friday. I pinged a few people at Google to get some clarity, and while they didn’t provide me with a specific […]

Rumors have been swirling for days about the possible delivery of a beta version of Google’s much-discussed Chrome OS this week, as we noted last Friday. I pinged a few people at Google to get some clarity, and while they didn’t provide me with a specific answer as to whether the download will arrive this week, they did send me an invitation to a press event at Google’s Mountain View campus on Thursday morning, billed as “an update on our progress with Google Chrome OS.” In other words, it sounds like we’ll get to try it very soon.

According to the invitation, Google VP of Product Management Sundar Pichai will be speaking along with Matthew Papakipos, engineering director for Google Chrome OS. There will be demos shown and an overview of “launch plans for next year.” Chrome OS, of course, is squarely aimed at the netbook market, but it could head in other directions, too (Gigaom Pro, subscription req’d.).

That last bit about launch plans next year doesn’t rule out a beta arriving soon. When releasing an operating system, getting working drivers for peripheral devices, making deals with hardware makers and many more issues come into play, so if we do see a downloadable version arrive this week, it’s likely to be a very early stab at the final OS. However, Microsoft has proved resoundingly that by putting more early versions of its new OS in the hands of beta testers, it can deliver a better finished product. Perhaps Google will go that route as well, and it would be in keeping with their usual “long beta” strategy. We’ll update you with more details on Thursday.

  1. Isn’t the beta what google always does anyway..

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  2. “Release early and release often” is an open source mantra. Has been since at least the early ’90s, and multiple alpha and beta releases are the norm for most Linux distros (anticipated basis of Chrome). So, “Microsoft has proved resoundingly that by putting more early versions of its new OS in the hands of beta testers, it can deliver a better finished product” is an absurdly naive comment. MS adopted this time tested open-source method. You got it backwards. Yet another case of FLOSS leading the way and proprietary groups following.

    While hardware drivers are certainly a challenge given the preferential treatment that manufacturers have given to certain OSs, the library of available drivers is quite extensive (since they aren’t building Chrome from scratch), and I’d expect widespread support to be available, though there will be limited deficiencies. Unless the developers intentionally limit access – not likely.

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  3. [...] officially jealous that I can’t go to the Google press event on Thursday where the Chrome OS will be shown. Our GigaOm Network Editor in Chief, Sebastian Rupley, has the invite, so maybe I can convince him [...]

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  4. [...] drop in seven days time.  That’s looking all the more likely today, with Google apparently sending out invitations to a Chrome OS event to be held on Thursday.  According to GigaOm, Google are describing the event [...]

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  5. Win7 is doing pretty well…but i m eager to see what Google’s OS has to offer..i hope they support PC gaming completely…cus IMO that is windows biggest advantage…

    Steve
    http://www.isopurewater.com/

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    1. “i hope they support PC gaming completely…”

      Once again, this OS is targeted at *netbooks*. Even if it has full Windows compatibility (doubtful) are you really going to have a frag-fest on your eee?

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    2. Game makers will write for whatever platform they see customers using, so if consumers pick up Chrome heavily, the games will come. But don’t expect binary file games written for one platform to work with another – no system does that completely, though Linux is the best at it (Wine).

      Most users have no idea what “support” technically entails, or they would know better than to expect it. You need a compatible binary program, or to compile it from source on the desired system, and the source has to be compatible with that system’s methods/resources. Mac doesn’t support any Windows binary programs at all, period. Windows doesn’t support any Mac binary programs at all, period. Binaries are simply not compatible, and you need a binary for Windows for a program to run on Windows. Surprisingly, Linux can run many Windows binaries, including some games, but these are exceptions due to open-source creativity. It’s just one of the ways Linux out-performs Windows.

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  6. [...] looks like we were wrong.  Network Editor, Sebastian Rupley of GigaOm, has apparently received an invitation to a press conference tomorrow (19 November) at Google’s HG in Mountain View, California. The [...]

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  7. [...] reading available at: JKOntheRun, more from us, gigaom and an interesting one from [...]

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  8. [...] OS ne viendra pas concurrencer Windows 7 d’ici les fêtes de fin d’année. Bien que la première démonstration en fonctionnement du système d’exploitation de Google intervienne un mois environ après la sortie de l’OS de Microsoft, la concurrence n’est [...]

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  9. [...] Rumors have been swirling for days now about possible delivery of Google’s much discussed Chrome OS this week. GigaOm pinged a few people at Google to get confirmation on the rumor, and while they didn’t get back a specific answer on whether the download will arrive this week, there was an invitation to a press event at Google’s Mountain View campus on Thursday morning, billed by the company as "an update on our progress with Google Chrome OS." It sounds like everyone will get to try it very soon. Check out GigaOm for more details. [...]

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  10. [...] Google’s Chrome OS Will Be Shown This Week Rumors have been swirling for days about the possible delivery of a beta version of Google’s much-discussed Chrome OS this week, as we noted last Friday. I pinged a few people at Google to get some clarity, and while they didn’t provide me with a specific answer as to whether the download will arrive this week, they did send me an invitation to a press event at Google’s Mountain View campus on Thursday morning, billed as “an update on our progress with Google Chrome OS.” In other words, it sounds like we’ll get to try it very soon. [...]

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