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[qi:gigaom_icon_geolocation] Nextstop, a user-generated travel site, is releasing an API for its location-specific short-form recommendations. The self-funded company, founded by former Google product managers, only launched in June and has attracted low hundreds of thousands of monthly visitors, however it has ambitious plans to be a […]

[qi:gigaom_icon_geolocation] Nextstop, a user-generated travel site, is releasing an API for its location-specific short-form recommendations. The self-funded company, founded by former Google product managers, only launched in June and has attracted low hundreds of thousands of monthly visitors, however it has ambitious plans to be a global (read: not hubbed around a few cities like Yelp) and comprehensive resource of recommended places and activities.

For now Nextstop is just a web site, and an English-language one at that, but the API enables things like automated Twitter queries (built in-house as an example) where you can ask @nextstopbot what’s good and near to an address. The six-person Nextstop team, said co-founder Carl Sjogreen (best known as product manager of Google Calendar), has put much focus into laying the groundwork to scale to be “a Wikipedia of all the great places in the world,” spending much of its time working on things like a reputation system to give good users more contribution powers.

The race to build a database of the world’s coolest locations may be moving faster than San Francisco-based Nextstop, though, with companies like Foursquare — which also just released an API — using the real-time and personal nature of mobile, as well as social gaming, to incentivize user contributions. Others working on location databases include Mozilla, uLocate and Geodelic. Though it seems folks like Twitter and Facebook could easily propel themselves past the competition with their highly social user bases.

  1. [...] the world that location really is everything. But GigaOm reports that Foursquare is hardly alone in the race to build a database of the world’s coolest locations. Nextstop, a user-generated travel site founded by ex-Google product managers, also released its [...]

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  2. [...] the world that location really is everything. But GigaOm reports that Foursquare is hardly alone in the race to build a database of the world’s coolest locations. Nextstop, a user-generated travel site founded by ex-Google product managers, also released its [...]

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  3. [...] | Wednesday, November 18, 2009 | 6:00 AM PT | 0 comments | 0 tweets retweet » With of an infrastructure of social location information just starting to coagulate, the monetization side is raring to go. Since real-time mobile [...]

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  4. [...] the world that location really is everything. But GigaOm reports that Foursquare is hardly alone in the race to build a database of the world’s coolest locations. Nextstop, a user-generated travel site founded by ex-Google product managers, also released its [...]

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  5. [...] topics I wanted to focus on was location. Let’s just say that hasn’t exactly been a difficult task. Coming at us from Boulder, San Francisco and London, here are today’s top three geo-tagging [...]

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  6. [...] Agreed! I think that’s why I’m confounded by some of the offerings of startups that have cropped up. Ask any of the mobile industry insiders and they all say that enhanced location and location-related APIs will become core offerings of major platforms — be it iPhone, Android, BlackBerry or the web. Twitter’s decision to buy Mixer Labs, parent company of GeoAPI, is one such example. (Related: “Who Will Foster the Great Location API?) [...]

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  7. [...] co-founder Carl Sjogreen (he’s the Google Calendar guy) told us last year that Nextstop’s goal was to be “a Wikipedia of all the great places in the [...]

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