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Summary:

There are people whose brains go in one linear direction, whose ideas make sense and come from a decidedly logical place. Those people are rarely any good at comedy, especially the more absurdist humor that excels online. What I’m saying is that Scott Gairdner‘s sketches don’t […]

There are people whose brains go in one linear direction, whose ideas make sense and come from a decidedly logical place. Those people are rarely any good at comedy, especially the more absurdist humor that excels online. What I’m saying is that Scott Gairdner‘s sketches don’t necessarily make a ton of sense, but that is why they are hilarious.

Gairdner, named the “King of Dot Comedy” by G4′s Attack of the Show, is a solo act who’s been creating web comedy since 2006. After his first spoof shorts went viral, Collegehumor began commissioning pieces; his stuff has also been featured by YouTube and FunnyOrDie. It’s deserved attention, as his work represents some of the best in pop-culture parody (with a heavy emphasis on video games), enabled not just by Gairdner’s solid acting and directing chops, but technical skill as an editor and effects artist, which helps him to nimbly parody MTV’s My Super Sweet 16 and imagine CNN’s hologram technology getting disturbing real-world applications.

But it’s Gairdner’s unique POV that helps his shorts stand out in an admittedly oversaturated marketplace for sketch comedy. Today, for example, he released one of the most perfectly bizarre shorts to grace the web recently, a third installment of Tiny Fuppets. Conceived as Portugal’s rip-off of the classic cartoon Muppet Babies, this episode shows the “Fuppets” trying to become Internet millionaires — which (cue sarcastic voice) isn’t hard at all.

Plenty of Muppet Babies parodies have been done (being as it was popular during the 1980s, the formative years of Internet comedy’s current target audience). But in Portuguese? With the appropriately mis-translated subtitles? It’s a spin you couldn’t predict, and makes an otherwise stale concept pleasantly fresh.

Tiny Fuppets‘s crude animation and out-there comedy covers up a very real mocking of the idea of becoming wealthy thanks to the Internet. It’s a point that must strike home for Gairdner, whose videos regularly achieve viewcounts ranging in the five and six digits on YouTube, but has yet to be scooped up by any major entity. But after four years, he’s still producing web content — while he definitely counts as a talent I’d love to see break out into the mainstream, it’s nice to see that for now, at least, he’s still having fun here.

  1. [...] out in an admittedly oversaturated marketplace for sketch comedy”.Read the whole thing here:Scott Gairdner’s Tiny Fuppets: Just The Tip of a Hilarious IcebergAnd if you haven’t yet, watch the new Tiny [...]

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  2. Write about Scott Gairdner and not plug Scottober (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-5tTPmxywhg)? Blasphemy!

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  3. [...] world — an incomplete list from the poster includes Erik Beck (Indy Mogul), Chris Cantwell, Scott Gairdner, Adam Quirk (Wreck and Salvage), Mike Rose (Channel 101), Tyler Spiers [...]

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  4. [...] world — an incomplete list from the poster includes Erik Beck (Indy Mogul), Chris Cantwell, Scott Gairdner, Adam Quirk (Wreck and Salvage), Mike Rose (Channel 101), Tyler Spiers [...]

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