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Summary:

Windows Mobile gets no respect from smartphone makers, with a number of them already deserting the phone OS for alternatives. An investment note claims that consumer electronics giant Samsung is also scaling back the phones it will produce using WinMo. HMC Investment Securities analyst Greg Noh […]

leakWindows Mobile gets no respect from smartphone makers, with a number of them already deserting the phone OS for alternatives. An investment note claims that consumer electronics giant Samsung is also scaling back the phones it will produce using WinMo. HMC Investment Securities analyst Greg Noh says that Samsung’s phone line will drop from 80 percent WinMo currently, to 50 percent next year and down to 20 percent in 2012.

Samsung is expected to increase its use of Android to 30 percent of its product line next year, and keep its usage at that level. The usage of Symbian on Samsung phones will drop to just a few percent, with dropping it entirely planned for 2011.

The analyst goes on to claim that Samsung is developing its own smartphone OS, and it will start appearing on its phones next year. The new proprietary OS usage will expand to gradually encompass half of Samsung’s product line.

“If accurate, the switch in strategy may reflect a combined larger exodus away from Windows Mobile for those major firms that still use the platform. HTC, the largest single Windows Mobile device maker, has already been rumored as switching more than half of its 2010 phones to Android. LG has signed a pact with Microsoft to make Windows Mobile phones but even now has introduced its first Android phone and is said by HMC to be extending its use significantly more.”

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  1. Samsung abandoning ship is a serious blow to the Windows Mobile platform. It is plain to all that the viability of Windows Mobile is now under serious question.

    I think business and enterprise users really need to think about abandoning the sinking Windows Mobile ship. The obvious alternative is RIM’s Blackberry, and then iPhone and Android, all of which recently increased their market share.

  2. The Blackberry, despite considered by many to be the ideal e-mail tool, misses the mark in important ways (no HTML e-mail? Really? and the UI is awful). The iPhone, despite being a very popular consumer device, misses the mark in important ways (encryption support, remote wipe, application control, awful ActiveSync implementation) as well. Android doesn’t have EAS at all until 2.0. So, if you are using Exchange (and if you’re business/enterprise, it’s a very strong bet that you are), and you want to control the device, it’s Windows Mobile, or it’s nothing.

    This is about money, and nothing but money. Windows Mobile costs money, and Android does not. It’s that simple. Anyone who deludes themselves into thinking it’s anything else is just missing the mark.

  3. Samsung making its own Smartphone OS…

    Huge mistake. Are they seriously going to try betamaxin’ it out there in the big bad world of smartphones? Have they learned nothing from their Instinct, the wanna-be iPhone killer?

  4. I recently bought a Windows Mobile smartphone because it was so cheap and I hadn’t played with WM for a long time. I didn’t plan on using it as a phone, obviously. Nothing can replace my E90. Imagine how shocked and disappointed I was to find that the same bugs that plagued the 2003 version I have in my Toshoiba e800 are still present in this latest version! Problems opening Word documents in Mobile Word, no support for password protected Word documents, Activesync (or whatever they call it) still being one of the worst applications ever – when it does connect, why does it let the phone switch off when it’s still transferring files? I’m not surprised people are always complaining about how out of date it is.

  5. Fortunately, someone did some research and it turns out that this whole story is largely FUD.

    http://wmpoweruser.com/?p=10029

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