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Summary:

Yesterday I called my dad on my cell phone (neither of us have landlines) to tell him about something his granddaughter did, and a few minutes into the conversation he asked if I were near my computer. If I was, couldn’t we Skype instead? In my […]

jetsonsYesterday I called my dad on my cell phone (neither of us have landlines) to tell him about something his granddaughter did, and a few minutes into the conversation he asked if I were near my computer. If I was, couldn’t we Skype instead? In my home Skype is both the P2P telephony program and a verb for video chat. My dad now prefers to Skype with me rather than talk on the phone, a tipping point of sorts in the way we communicate. He said he grew up watching cartoons where folks like the Jetsons talked via videophone, and since the possibility is here today he wants to use it.

In this multimodal communications world, the phone companies, which still rely on voice for both wired and about a quarter of their wireless revenue, should be worried. Voice revenue isn’t growing in the U.S., but that doesn’t mean that it couldn’t if carriers got a bit more creative. So far, data is helping phone companies that have wireless networks as well as those that are providing Ethernet backhaul for anticipated growth in data.

voicearpu

However, the real focus at carriers should be about getting beyond merely providing the pipe in this multimodal world. Check out what BT is doing with its Ribbit acquisition, as an example.

Skype CEO Josh Silverman would certainly be thrilled to hear about my dad’s preferred form of communication, as would the Telepresence folks at Cisco hoping to get the same thing happening in the business world. Silverman told Om in September:

“We are pretty big on video calling,” Silverman told me. The company is putting a lot of resources into building a better video conferencing experience, he said, because he believes that person-to-person video calling is going to be as big as video. That absolutely makes sense because today the definition of communication is constantly changing. In the past, the world was all about voice, then instant messages and now video calling. People are sending messages and status updates via Twitter and Facebook. The communications are now multimodal.

Perhaps in the not-too-distant future my phone calls with be less about voice and more about video, voice, link sharing, and even media sharing all within the context of a television or PC screen. I can turn parts of it on or off as needed. It’s like the vision for social TV that Liz outlined back on March (subscription required) rather than the Jetsons-style videophone that my dad is so excited about right now. The carriers are implementing on this social vision for television, but they should be thinking about adding this to voice as well.

  1. “He said he grew up watching cartoons where folks like the Jetsons talked via videophone, and since the possibility is here today he wants to use it.”

    In some ways, that captures my sentiment as well…although I was watching the Jetsons as reruns.

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  2. Stacey, you realize your title makes absolutely no sense? Using Skype is still ‘talking’ to you. It should have been, “My Dad Doesn’t Want to Talk to Me Anymore on the Phone”.

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    1. Stacey Higginbotham Monday, November 9, 2009

      I thought about that, but it kind of showcased the momentary rush of indignation I felt when my dad implied that merely talking to me wasn’t good enough — he had to see me too. It was a gut response, and so I went with that in the headline. But yes, you are correct.

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  3. the video calling is wonderful. i frequently connect the pc to the hdtv and talk to family around the world every weekend. works very nicely.

    to me this shows how attitudes change, 4-5 years people said that this kind of video calls would never work because people did not want to do video conferences in their bathrobes. never understood why that was such a big deal. on skype you request a video call and the other party can just do a normal call if they prefer.

    to me this was cable’s opportunity with VoIP (4-5 years ago) but they have decided to replicate the wired phone experience. do not see how this is a winning proposition for them in the long run.

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  4. I can relate Stacey.
    Whenever I call my kids they say; “can’t we just text instead?”

    I doubt video calls will help, because they have to stay in one place to do it.
    While I am not big on texting, I’d rather hear your voice, at least they are willing to communicate in some way.

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    1. Stacey Higginbotham Monday, November 9, 2009

      Ron, do they really not want to converse at all? Even in person? I don’t know if I look forward to this with my three-year-old.

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      1. Stacey,
        My kids stay with their Mom and I’m in a different state so conversing in person doesn’t happen often enough. So it is text, which they prefer, or short phone calls.

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  5. [...] the move by Skype could have severe consequences for the telecom industry, which has already seen voice revenues decline over the last several years. By cutting out the middle man and giving users a richer experience [...]

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  6. [...] the move by Skype could have severe consequences for the telecom industry, which has already seen voice revenues decline over the last several years. By cutting out the middle man and giving users a richer experience [...]

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  7. [...] consumers to connect not just with voice, but with video. For example, I’ve written how my dad no longer wants to talk to me, when he could video chat instead, and Skype CEO Josh Silverman, Cisco and even Logitech are [...]

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  8. [...] for consumers to connect not just with voice, but with video. For example, I’ve written how my dad no longer wants to talk to me, when he could video chat instead, and Skype CEO Josh Silverman, Cisco and even Logitech are [...]

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