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Summary:

NewTeeVee Live is less than a week away! This year we’ve done away with the panel format and are sticking mostly with one-on-one fireside chats and solo presentations. I’m super excited for the fireside chats I’m hosting as I get to talk with folks from Xbox […]

NewTeeVee Live is less than a week away! This year we’ve done away with the panel format and are sticking mostly with one-on-one fireside chats and solo presentations.

I’m super excited for the fireside chats I’m hosting as I get to talk with folks from Xbox LIVE, Comcast, Roku and Redbox. I know what I want to ask them, but just as Liz did earlier, I’m curious about what you want to know. Leave your thoughts and suggestions in the comment section.

We kick off the conference with Marc Whitten, general manager of Xbox LIVE. The Xbox video experience is getting more social with the addition of Netflix viewing parties and Twitter and Facebook functionality built into the platform. How will the company be able to transform this hard core gaming machine into a family-friendly entertainment system?

Next up is Comcast Interactive Media president Amy Banse. Obviously the cable co’s TV Everywhere initiative is top of mind as it and preps its move from trials to a national roll-out. How are those trials working? What has the company learned? What have been the challenges?

Roku’s CEO Anthony Wood is bound to talk up his just-launched new set-top boxes as well as the expanding number of channels his company offers. How will Roku stay competitive as more over-the-top devices come to market? How will it strike a balance between a clean UI and an ever-growing channel selection?

Redbox has disrupted the home video entertainment world with its dollar-a-night movie rentals that challenge perceptions of what a movie’s worth. Gary Cohen, Redbox’s senior vice-president of marketing and consumer experience, will be on hand to answer questions like how has the company managed its meteoric growth? Did it always know its bold value proposition would attract so much attention (and not just from consumers)? Can they keep rentals at just $1?

That’s just the tip of the iceberg and there are sure to be many more insights and unexpected revelations from the day. So leave a question in the comments and grab a ticket to the show so you can be first to know what these game-changing companies have in store.

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  1. Chris, can you ask Whitten when the XBox Marketplace will stop using those childish “Microsoft Points”? This extra step of having to add points before you buy something is ridiculous. I never really know what any of the content costs because all the prices are in this one-stepped removed micro-economy. In the age of iTunes can’t they just use dollars and cents and charge my credit card each time I download something?

    Thanks and good luck!

    Craig.

    1. That is a question I have asked them before, and they were stickin’ with the credits. Agreed that it’s dumb. Will ask again. .

      1. Sigh, that’s what I thought. Thanks for pestering them about it anyway!

  2. I want to know if Comcast is interested in buying Netflix now Netflix is stealing market share from cable TV where viewers can watch many of the shows that cable has on demand on a game console or set top box over the Internet .With Apple getting into the same market with its streaming service next year this seems to be a space that is heating right up.

    1. Hey Matt, I was thinking of it a different way, but yeah, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings basically said his company was a short-term threat to cable’s vid biz.

  3. Also you should ask Redbox what are thier plans when the Disk format dies out in the next decade in favour of streaming video over IP based networks .

  4. Paul Zagaeski Friday, November 6, 2009

    Hey Chris,
    None of these companies have an online ad hoc payment capability as part of the basic system platform (they all want users to be paying subscribers… well, except Redbox).

    Are any of these guys thinking that micropayment or spontaneous payment or some other terminology for ad hoc is a way to draw in users who might like to sample their content?

  5. “NewTeeVee Live is less than a week away!” Who cares? Broadband doesn’t exist in Seattle, so I can’t watch it anyways.

    1. take your laptop into a central business district or university area for good broadband download rates. Watch my #ntvl09 livestream on Thursday: http://www.justin.tv/richreader

  6. How will the IPTV players like Xbox and Roku deliver higher-tier pay (USA, TBS, Travel Channel) and premium (HBO, SHO, etc.) in HD such that consumers just won’t want to resist further? Will they force cable and satellite to unbundle at favorable rates? Will they bring highly desirable content not available in the CATV/Sat tiers? With the amount of innovation that has taken place, and the awesome piles of duckettes spewed on the picks & shovels, more attractive packages have got to be waved in consumers’ faces.

    In a separate vein, what’s happening with Move Networks and the Intel-Yahoo Widget Channel Framework. I really expected them to show off big time after the presentations that they made at CineQuest earlier this year: http://richreader.blogspot.com/2009/04/broadcast-cable-and-online-content.html and http://richreader.blogspot.com/2009/03/bridging-content-delivery-gap-between.html

    Looking forward to seeing how you’ll weave this line of questioning into the grill pattern on Thursday.

    Rich

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