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Summary:

The Interactive Advertising Bureau is calling on the Federal Trade Commission to withdraw its recently revised guidelines governing dealings…

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The Interactive Advertising Bureau is calling on the Federal Trade Commission to withdraw its recently revised guidelines governing dealings between bloggers and marketers. The ad trade group says the rules “unfairly and unconstitutionally” impose penalties on online media for practices, while exempting traditional media. Furthermore, in an open letter to FTC Chairman Jon Leibowitz, Randall Rothenberg, the IAB’s president and CEO, says the FTC

  1. The thing about this that no one mentions is consistency. In the world of marketing advertorials MUST be labeled as such in traditional media. Now the Internets have created a new niche for Joe Schmoe blogger to cover products from the everyday consumer perspective and now that they have developed credibility they are being called to be responsible for that credibility! Suck it up! PR and advertising has done just fine labeling their content for what it is and even though there are a fair share of hucksters in each industry, it helps keep most honest. Just as the FTC said, its not about unfairly targeting bloggers its about creating a little oversight for penalizing the abusers out on the wild wild net.

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  2. Kyle E. Glass Friday, October 16, 2009

    It's unfortunate that there has to be guidelines telling people to be openly honest. I'm usually not a fan of more gov't regulation, but it's obvious there needs to be some when influencing sales. Sometimes being openly honest takes more effort than not. I think this is a great, and if you strive to be transparent then whether you will receive a fine or a warning doesn't matter.

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  3. Never seen so many "Web 2.0 bloggers" so worried about the startup companies they hype on their so-called "tech blog" working on behalf of VC firms.

    If some tech blogger is hyping up one tech startup over another tech startup and that blogger have relationships with VC firms funding the favored tech startup, this should require the FTC to crack down hard with fines.

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