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Summary:

NeighborGoods, a web site that lets you share stuff with people in your neighborhood, today is launching publicly in its first city, Los Angeles. It’s somewhat of a cross between Facebook and Craigslist. For example, if you need to borrow a power drill for a home […]

neighborgoods logoNeighborGoods, a web site that lets you share stuff with people in your neighborhood, today is launching publicly in its first city, Los Angeles. It’s somewhat of a cross between Facebook and Craigslist. For example, if you need to borrow a power drill for a home improvement project, you can search for someone in the NeighborGoods community who’s willing to lend one. L.A.-based founder and CEO Micki Krimmel said she was inspired by sites like Craigslist and Freecycle. She hopes NeighborGoods will help people connect with others in their area and encourage them to borrow — rather than buy — things they plan to use once.

The site lets people charge for the use of their stuff or offer it for free. However, if you plan on earning money from the site, you have to upgrade to a Pro account. For now, people who sign up for an account get one year free. Krimmel will start charging for it once she decides on a price point. If you’re a Pro account member, you’ll receive a “verified” stamp on your profile, which shows that the NeighborGoods team has confirmed you’re a real person who lives in the area you say you do.

When you’re putting an item up for rent on the site, you can choose whether your friends, neighbors or anyone on the site can see the listing. If someone doesn’t return an item you loaned out or returns it in poor condition, you can click on a “panic button” that notifies NeighborGoods of the problem and puts an unresolved transaction alert on the person’s profile.

Krimmel has received $100,000 in funding from a former client and will be looking for more investors as she rolls the site out to other cities. It’s too early to say whether the site will be a hit, but it touches on the social-networking trend and could piggyback off the success of Craigslist. Krimmel will be profiled in next month’s Oprah Magazine.

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  1. nice idea, but feels MUCH more like a utility, not an actual company – and would be well served by simply becoming a facebook app since it assumes that members a) use the internet, b) manage social contacts online and c) keep track of things…but yet another login? another site? can’t see it…and what an odd item for oprah magazine beyond the ‘doing good’ aspect…

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    1. Jennifer Martinez Wednesday, October 7, 2009

      Turning it into a Facebook app is an interesting idea, especially if an apt. building or college dorm used NeighborGoods to share stuff.

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      1. We definitely plan to do more integration with other services like Facebook and Twitter. Additionally, you’ll be able to log in using Facebook Connect very soon and we already support OpenID.

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  2. “Neighborgoods: Craigslist for your neighborhood”… isn’t that precisely what Craigslist is?

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    1. We’re actually aiming to connect friends and hyper-local neighbors in a safe and lasting community that builds value over time. Craigslist doesn’t have the social or localization features that define NeighborGoods and once something is posted on Craigslist, it’s gone forever. NeighborGoods is a lasting inventory system of the stuff (and people) in your neighborhood.

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  3. I beleive that this site has some real potential. In our area we have a time bank in which people perform services and are credited with time to receive services. So far it has been very successful. The difference with this and craigslist that I see is that you will be connecting on a more personal level with those that live in your area. I belevie that it will foster a sense of community that is sorely missing in our world today. I also beleive that regular people need to find ways to live that takes control of their lives back from the financial/insurance industry that has us all by the throats and continues to squeeze even after they’ve been given billions for screwing up their jobs. Anyway I wish you luck.

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  4. [...] keep away shady people from stealing stuffs. When a new user sends NeighborGoods his/her address, NeighborGoods sends a physical mail which contains a special code for you. Once you verify your address, your [...]

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  5. [...] NeighborGoods: Craigslist for Your Neighborhood. [...]

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  6. Loving this… I have started up something similar, but far less web-savvy in Bend, Oregon, called the Tool Lending and Service Trading Switchboard… or just The Switchboard. I’d love some feedback and insight.

    http://www.switchboardbend.com

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