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Summary:

Nearly half of the electric car charging equipment installed worldwide by 2015 will be heading to China, according to a recent report from Pike Research. Today an announcement from Scottsdale, Ariz.-based charging infrastructure company ECOtality indicates that China’s role in the electric car charging boom will […]

Nearly half of the electric car charging equipment installed worldwide by 2015 will be heading to China, according to a recent report from Pike Research. Today an announcement from Scottsdale, Ariz.-based charging infrastructure company ECOtality indicates that China’s role in the electric car charging boom will encompass not only installing the equipment domestically, but also building it for international deployment. Down the road, when you pull up to a charge point, there’s a good chance it could have been made in China.

ecotality-china-factory

ECOtality, whose subsidiary eTec snagged a nearly $100 million federal stimulus grant last month to support what the company describes as “the largest deployment of EV chargers and vehicles ever” (12,750 charging systems in five states for 5,000 Nissan LEAF electric vehicles), says this morning that it has formed two joint ventures with China’s Shenzhen Goch Investment, or SGI, in order to manufacture, assemble and sell EV charging equipment in China.

According to this morning’s release, SGI will contribute $10 million for the manufacturing and assembly venture, which SGI founder Dongsheng Gong envisions will supply charging systems for “industrial, airport and on-road electric vehicle applications around the world,” and another $5 million for the sales effort.

The market for electric car charging systems in China is being driven by several forces. Chinese automakers, including BYD, Chery and Geely, have a strategic reason to go electric: Legacy car companies in North America, Europe and Japan haven’t yet mastered the technology, and so moving early and fast could allow China-based companies to grab a lead in the nascent market.

In addition, as China’s vice minister for industry and information technology, Miao Wei, a former Dongfeng Motor chairman, told the New York Times earlier this year, “the Chinese auto industry cannot grow sustainably” unless the “bottlenecks” of air pollution, rising consumption of imported oil and traffic congestion are addressed. Hoping to alleviate at least some of these problems, the Chinese government has thrown its weight behind electric vehicles, providing subsidies for research and electric vehicle purchases. All of that spells big opportunity for a company like ECOtality.

Rendering of ancitipated Tianjin manufacturing facility courtesy of ECOtality

  1. [...] 4.) China makes progress on electric car chargers. [...]

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  2. Charging points are already starting to appear on the streets of London, UK: http://www.plentyways.com/blog/2009/08/charge-your-electric-car-in-london/

    Drivers of electric cars are also entitled to various other peaks such as no road tax and congestion charge exemption. Simple schemes that are making it more and more attractive to drive an electric car.

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    1. Batteries will become more efficient on the whole and their price will drop, whereas the oil will simply go up and up as it becomes more scarce. As simple as that.

    2. The range of terrific EVs are sufficient to meet the daily driving needs of more than 95% of drivers ((The vast majority of people (95%) drive less than 100/km a day, 82% of the respondents said they drive 40 miles or less a day, with an average daily driving distance of 27 miles.)).

    3. I’m hopeful that the charge network will extend the select districts to nation-wide scale throughout the world, and this environment can usher in active private investings in EVs.

    4. I remain confident that it could give rise to multiple times as much investing effect, so to speak, some billions of investing, this simple deployment, could breed the most-sought energy independence and solid recovery around the world.

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  3. Nice to see US taxpayer stimulus money going to the Peoples Republic of China. That will stimulate more jobs there and more debt here. Unbelievable.

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  4. [...] to support the construction of more than 12,000 charging systems in five U.S. states. The company announced last September that it had formed two joint ventures with Shenzhen Goch to manufacture, assemble and sell EV [...]

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