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Summary:

Now that our Mobilize event is over, I’m sitting at the gate in SFO waiting to head home. I’ve barely had a chance to sit in the past 24 hours, let alone catch up on any mobile tech news, so I’m doing both now. One of […]

gdial-pro_2009-27-08_153144Now that our Mobilize event is over, I’m sitting at the gate in SFO waiting to head home. I’ve barely had a chance to sit in the past 24 hours, let alone catch up on any mobile tech news, so I’m doing both now. One of the first bits to cross my screen is a post from the Palm blog stating that the App Catalog just gained nine new titles. I doubt I’ll download them all, but I’ve got time to kill — and a second battery for my phone — so I’ll be checking out several of them.

gDial Pro, my most oft-used app on the Pre, is now official. That’s the “as close to native as you can get” Google Voice software I use on my Pre. AccuRadio makes an appearance as well, allowing you to stream digital radio on the go. Simple Bible is what it says — a King James Version of the Bible that offers four different font sizes. Gamers can indulge in three new titles: Video Poker, Lights Out and Checkers all make it to the official catalog. And since I get most of my news from my phones these days, I’ll probably add the new Forbes app to my handset, too. Local Concert, Currency Converter and 420 Wallpaper round out the new selections.

I’ve used a fair number of both the official and unofficial third-party apps for the Pre by now and one thought keeps recurring in my mind. These apps are solid. What I mean is — there was a bunch of negativity around the web when Palm said all apps would be built on HTML, CSS and JavaScript. People initially equated that to the original web apps in the iPhone’s first year of existence. Having used dozens of these apps, it’s clear to me that the concerns are unfounded. We might not have seen a “killer app” like the new Facebook client for the iPhone, but apps on the Palm Pre are far better than what many expected.

  1. “unfounded”? The concerns were well founded in the poor performance of the web apps on the iphone. That web browser technology, even on the iphone itself, has advanced so rapidly in the last two years is a wonderful development.

    But I will raise to your attention the fact that even with the better performance available for web 2.0 apps, today all the activity on the iphone dev community is in native apps. Apple’s native development tools and frameworks have I think shown themselves quite well by the number of apps that have been delivered in the last year or so.

    The rate at which apps are dribbling out for the Pre I think also speaks to the quality of the Apple tools as well.

    I still say you aren’t going to get Madden NFL 2010 on a Pre using Javascript, even with the newer optimizations to the javascript engines.

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  2. scotty…you seem to be ill equipped for reading. the article mentions ‘unfounded concerns’ in relation to the expectation that Pre apps would be subjected to the same poor performance of web apps for the original iPhone; this is not a reference to the well founded concerns of original iPhone apps.

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  3. Kev – you seem to be really digging the Pre. Even took it instead of the iPhone on this trip – right? Just interested in your reasons for gravitating over. Newness of the platform? Tired of the iPhone?

    Have to say, I was a Sprint customer for 10 years and had a Pre for 3 weeks. I now have a 3GS and love it. Your video sample that you posted when you got the 3GS was a positive for me in making the switch (well, that and the fact they went to the 850mHz network here in Austin TX).

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  4. Scotty
    You don’t understand (and to be fair most seem to misunderstand teh big technical difference). Increase in performance wouldn’t have helpd Apple web apps: Pre ‘web apps’ are not web apps in the sense that they are installed on the phone and have API to access features of the OS (like video and audio APIs, access to data on the phone, etc). The data (and the UI) doesnt come over the ‘web’. Its called web OS and the technology for rendering the UI is based on web technologies – but the apps doesn’t sit on a web server somewhere and doesn’t require that data come over the web.

    >>…concerns were well founded in the poor performance of the web apps on the iphone. That web browser technology, even on the iphone itself, has advanced so rapidly in the last two years is a wonderful development.

    Has nothing to do with it – iPhone web apps are essentially normal web apps that sit on a server and serve up pages, with all data coming over the web. There is a massive difference in terms of performance on the Pre because they are installed on the device and NEVER has to go to the web for anything (depending on what the app designer wants it to do of course).

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  5. kind of picking up on HSK’s comment – i’ve been an unhappy blackberry pearl user for some time now and am deciding on palm pre or iphone 3gs…
    jkontherun is totally pumping the pre, and personally i like it, but maybe we could get an indepth review after having been using it as your go to device for some time now. batter life, keyboard, app, sprint impressions etc..
    also – do i get this right? – you pay sprint 69.99 for all data plan and download gdial and you have unlimited calling?
    thx

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    1. pricing is $69.99 for the Everything Data 450 Plan

      you get Unlimited Data, SMS, MMS, NAV, and Sprint TV.

      you get Unlimited Any Mobile which includes unlimited calls to cell phones regardless of carrier. 7PM Nights and Weekends and No roaming or long distance charges.

      Gdial will still use your minutes unless its at night or weekend because it isn’t like VOIP.

      If you go with Pre and Sprint make sure you check for discounts they range from 10-27% and can be simple to get (Credit Union Members, Students, Military, AOL Members, and many other organizations.)

      this can take it down much further

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