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Summary:

Aspera, a company that speeds up the transfer of fat data files, has signed a partnership agreement with Amazon’s Web Services, which means companies trying to send large files can use Aspera’s proprietary file transfer protocol to upload multigigabyte files or larger to EC2. Aspera can […]

Aspera, a company that speeds up the transfer of fat data files, has signed a partnership agreement with Amazon’s Web Services, which means companies trying to send large files can use Aspera’s proprietary file transfer protocol to upload multigigabyte files or larger to EC2. Aspera can send 10-gigabyte files in three minutes, which is about three times faster than normal. Solving the problem of sending large files to the cloud led Amazon earlier this year to offer a service that lets people mail their files to the online retailer rather than try to send them via the web. Below, I talk to Aspera CEO and Co-founder Michelle Munson about the Amazon partnership and what it means for companies trying to send fat files to the cloud.

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By Stacey Higginbotham

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  1. 10 Gigabytes in 3 minutes = 57 MBytes/Sec = 455 Mbps. Are service provider providing 455 Mbps uplink dedicated connection or I am missing something?

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  2. aspera technology proven for bulk data transfer. suggestion to the company: license the technology to mobile phone company .

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    1. Stacey Higginbotham Wednesday, September 16, 2009

      They are working to bring it to the iPhone.

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  3. Can they send a 10gb ZIP file on a 0 packet lose network with the same speed.

    Most of these products do well if you have high packet lose and / or high network latency.

    Jay

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  4. [...] I’ve long been a fan of Aspera, which has a proprietary method for moving bits around, and — unlike popular protocols — takes full advantage of an existing broadband pipe for the file’s entire journey. It is currently used by media companies for transporting huge video files from New York to Los Angeles and even for sending data to the cloud. Its move to the iPhone was something CEO and Co-founder Michele Munson talked about with me last September. [...]

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  5. [...] proprietary high-speed file-transport technology, fasp, before, including its products for both Amazon Web Services and the iPhone, but with more and more huge files and data sets making their way across the [...]

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