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The lyrics from I am the Walrus make as much sense as anything else I’ve heard today about the Beatles and iTunes as 09-09-09 hysteria build…

Beatles Rock Band screengrab

The lyrics from I am the Walrus make as much sense as anything else I’ve heard today about the Beatles and iTunes as 09-09-09 hysteria builds. The latest: claims that Yoko Ono (which would be pronounced Oh-No if this is all true) told Sky News that the availability of the Beatles catalog in iTunes would be announced Wednesday. At the same time, the FT reported that an EMI exec said no announcement was coming tomorrow. Sky was forced to backtrack quickly, pulling the story, according to 9to5Mac. (via Engadget)

For those who have been blessedly out of the loop, Wednesday is the day the Beatles’ remastered catalog goes on sale along with Beatles Rock Band edition; Apple (NSDQ: AAPL) also has a press cluster scheduled. That would make it a natural day for a grand announcement that the former litigants have come together, right? Not so fast. Ernesto Schmitt, EMI

  1. Don't worry, the story will die soon enough, along with the last vestiges of the spoiled, narcissistic baby boomers that still care about this music. They've had a stranglehold on the media for 30 years, forcing the rest of us to listen to them blather on about whatever was important to them when they were kids. Don't get me started on Woodstock…even Ang Lee couldn't make me care.

    I guarantee in 20 years no one will kick up this kind of fuss about The Pixies, and it's not because the music isn't equally good. It's because the generation that listened to it isn't completely self absorbed (though Jack Black may be).

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  2. @Erik Thanks but I don't want the music to go away. I hope some of it continues to reach people for a very long time. It may be that some of the anticipation comes from people who want to share it. But the hype, oy … it's a business story, not a cultural milestone.

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  3. @Staci: I know you do, just being prickly…these stories bring out the worst in baby busters like me. I really don't care what music people listen to, it's the cultural superiority of my priors I object to. As you say, not a cultural milestone.

    And (embarassed) of course I meant Frank Black…though part of me would like to see Tenacious D give Debaser a whirl :^)

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  4. Everyone has the right to their opinions.. I hadnt thought of baby boomers.. fact is.. the 60`s was a time of change..(boring…).. but had it not happened, everything DID evolve from it.. as did the radio ships FORCE the BBC to rethink their music policies. You younger people have no idea.. NO.. NOT THE WAR.. the 60`s .. late 50`s.. time of change.. NOW, if bands dont leap about.. they arent interesting.. well..The Shadows started their `walks` but the Beatles MOVED as did the Stones.. well, Mick did. Before them.. not a lot. If you werent there, you dont really qualify.
    Beatles music will live on.. BUT.. Yoko was premature in her statement.. first I`ve heard of it.. and i tunes may NOT be avalanched for the very reason the age group who LIKED the Beatles.. already HAVE the vinyls/cds.. IF/WHEN i tunes DO the deal. Beatles and such were designed for transistor radios.. the remixes MAY come across on ipods.

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  5. I personally don’t let what was happening at the time, or the people who listened to the music first interfere with the fact that it’s music I love. It reminds me of my mother who is gone now, and my childhood with her. I find it sad that I can’t just download My Life and reconnect. Music is art, it should be heard by whoever is looking for it and appreciates it. I hope they resolve this, cause I’ll be playing it for MY kids someday along with my generation’s music!!!

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