4 Comments

Summary:

Just as the Opera browser turned 10 yesterday — in terms of versions, that is — Google’s Chrome browser is one year old today. I can’t think of a browser that has generated a more polar view of opinions. Some love it for its speed and […]

jkotr-browser-shareJust as the Opera browser turned 10 yesterday — in terms of versions, that is — Google’s Chrome browser is one year old today. I can’t think of a browser that has generated a more polar view of opinions. Some love it for its speed and simplicity, while others find it too basic. We must have more of the former camp here than the latter because 7.23% of our page views in the last six months were in the Chrome browser. According to The Technologizer, Chrome only holds 2.9% of the overall browser market, so our audience appreciates the simple speediness of Chrome more than your average web user. As a point of reference, Firefox, Internet Explorer and Safari were used more than Chrome here, with “shares” of 44.61%, 29.05% and 14.43%, respectively. Opera rounds out the major browser usage for our site, holding at 2.44% or nearly one-third that of Google’s Chrome browser. I think the new Opera Turbo feature will help, but I’ll have to take another look in a few months to be sure.

Interesting to me is that Google Chrome has gained market share without many competing features. Although it’s in the works, Chrome is missing official extension support, which is something that gives Firefox a huge advantage over other browsers. Chrome only recently added themes and doesn’t yet offer bookmarking synchronization, although that too, is in the works. By focusing on the basics — a speedy JavaScript engine, a simple interface — combined with a new architecture that offers greater stability, the little Chrome engine that could is marching up the hill. As the browser matures into the “terrible twos,” I wouldn’t be surprised at all to see Chrome have a market share above 20%. No, it’s not for everyone. The best browser is the one that meets the individual needs that you and your device have. But even at a relatively immature state, it’s already picking up steam. What happens when it gains a “missing” feature like extension support?

  1. yes I am one of those Chrome users and I use it for most things such as reading news in Google Reader, viewing sites like this, YouTube, blogging and so on.

    I keep IE8 (installed by default in Windows 7) for all those lovely Microsoft websites and the odd site that does not work with Chrome.

    BUT I DO NOT USE FIREFOX

    I never thought I would hear myself say this but with all the add ons and features, it now feels bloated and heavy. Even IE looks slim by comparison.

    When I open a browser I do so to access content. I don’t care what colour the browser window is. Indeed I would rather not see the browser window at all.

    With Chrome it is all about the content. With Firefox (and IE) the experience is all about the browser.

    Share
  2. The latest version of Firefox 3.5, is plenty fast if you don’t load it up with too many extensions. And the full screen mode shows no menus or tabs. I will not switch to Chrome until they allow extensions like Adblock.

    Share
  3. Kevin. Chrome does provide bookmarks sync in Dev version. The stable release should have it pretty soon. I use Chrome on 3 windows systems (i use Dec version ) and on all 3 systems it is more stable than FireFox 3.5 . FireFox has become too bloated for its own good. Maybe they should think about Firefox lite

    Share
    1. That’s true indeed and I looked at it earlier this month. However, until it reaches the latest stable production version, most folks aren’t going to use it which is why I said it’s in the works. ;)

      Share

Comments have been disabled for this post