Summary:

It would be appropriate to quote a song like Barbra Streisand’s “The Way We Were” or even “Memory” from Cats given Pixorial‘s target market. The video sharing startup launches to the public today and is hoping to be a place where boomers, families and anyone with […]

It would be appropriate to quote a song like Barbra Streisand’s “The Way We Were” or even “Memory” from Cats given Pixorial‘s target market. The video sharing startup launches to the public today and is hoping to be a place where boomers, families and anyone with a pile of old VHS tapes can digitize and share their past online.

Pixorial works like this. If your video is already digital, you can upload it directly, if it’s stored on an old reel of film, a VHS tape or any number of different physical media, you send it via UPS to the Pixorial offices, where the company digitizes it. Once it’s been uploaded you get a link where you can view or edit the footage online. The resulting edited clip can then be shared online or you can purchase a DVD or hi-res download of it.

All the editing tools are online, and even better, you can invite others to collaborate on a video, so users can mix and match memories to create a whole new experience.

I had a couple of old VHS tapes that I hadn’t looked at in ages (I don’t even remember when I last had a VHS player). Pixorial let me test out the service and it worked as promised. I shipped off my tape, they digitized it and I spent a good part of one afternoon laughing at my much younger self and editing out the most embarrassing bits. Embedded is video from 1990 of me on a college bowl-style show called Quizzard that ran locally on Honolulu’s KHNL 13. No, that’s not me doing the rap — but that is my mullet, and those are my braces.

Though seeing those old Quizzard episodes is worth more than gold to some, Pixorial makes actual money through a few different revenue streams. The company offers a pro account for $25 a year, which has no archive limit, free accounts cap at 10GB and have ads. Pixorial also charges to digitize those old analog videos, and charges if you want a hi-res download (.99 cents), DVD ($10) or Mosaic ($20) of your video.

Pixorial isn’t alone in the personal video sharing space. Motionbox offers much of the same services.

Located in Denver, Colorado, Pixorial was founded in 2007. The company is privately funded and has 11 employees.

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