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Summary:

Nokia said today that more than a million users have signed up for its free mobile- and web-based email service, Ovi Mail, over the last six months. Designed for those without access to a PC, notably residents of developing countries, this uptake makes clear the increasing […]

nokian97.jpgNokia said today that more than a million users have signed up for its free mobile- and web-based email service, Ovi Mail, over the last six months. Designed for those without access to a PC, notably residents of developing countries, this uptake makes clear the increasing importance of mobile phones when it comes to accessing the web. The victory for Nokia, unfortunately, is somewhat bittersweet.

As Stacey has written, the future of the Internet looks increasingly mobile as three-quarters of the population will have access to mobile broadband in less than four years. Both Vodafone and Google see mobile phones as a gateway to get more people from developing regions on the web. In June, Google released three SMS-based mobile applications in Africa that allow people to access web information on their phones.

But the developing world’s love affair with Nokia’s cheap mobile phones and free Ovi email service hasn’t translated into high margins for the handset maker. While sales of its lower-end mobile phones continue to soar worldwide, Nokia’s smartphone sales lag behind — as do its profits. Until Nokia finds a way to boost its smartphone sales, high sales of its cheap mobile phones won’t be enough to pull the handset maker out of its financial slump.

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  1. payam @Oviapplications Wednesday, August 12, 2009

    Over at Oviapplications.com, I’ve blogged about several ways Nokia can improve the Ovi store experience. Its all about how Nokia can work with Symbian Developers to ensure that their apps are showcased in the Ovi store the right way. Many developers are not happy with the way Nokia has handled the DRM issues and because of this many leading publishers have decided to hold off on releasing their apps in Ovi yet.

    http://www.oviapplications.com/general/ovi-vs-android-store/

  2. Mobilize: MIT’s NextLab Seeks to Help Developing Countries Through Mobile Tech Thursday, September 10, 2009

    [...] alone in the belief that mobile phones provide a way to help the developing world. In June, Google released three SMS-based mobile applications in Africa that allow people to access web information on their phones. So far, the NextLab program has [...]

  3. Vodafone 360 Takes on Android, Apple and Nokia Thursday, September 24, 2009

    [...] communities such as Facebook and Twitter. Vodafone 360 — which sounds strikingly similar to Nokia’s Ovi — will be available across a variety of handsets including two new phones from Samsung: the [...]

  4. Reinhard Holzner Saturday, November 7, 2009

    Thats right – after we checked download DRM security on OVI we decided to withdraw our application from OVI store – i do not want to have a full version of my tool leaked on some warez site….

    http://www.theftaware.com is the new way to go – ANTI THEFT FOR MOBILE PHONES :-)

    best regards
    Reinhard

  5. Nokia Nabs Novarra for Better Browsing on Low-end Phones Friday, March 26, 2010

    [...] Nokia has long had a huge presence in the developing world, which it may be losing to cheaper handset providers. Building another path to revenue in countries [...]

  6. Brian’s Brain » Blog Archive » Analyzing Nokia’s Business: Past Performance Is No Guarantee Of Future Success Thursday, May 27, 2010

    [...] to enable it to catch up). Why? First and foremost, the bulk of the company’s sales (as any number of market analysts have pointed out in recent times) is mired in low-end handsets. Low end = low sales prices = low revenue and unclear [...]

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