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Summary:

Verizon wants to build its own app store, and is planning a July 28 event to entice developers to its platform. Like everyone else wooing programmers, the company hopes to get the equivalent of the in-crowd building the hottest apps that will elevate its store, and […]

IMG_2505Verizon wants to build its own app store, and is planning a July 28 event to entice developers to its platform. Like everyone else wooing programmers, the company hopes to get the equivalent of the in-crowd building the hottest apps that will elevate its store, and thus its phones and network, to the level of popularity that Apple’s iPhone currently enjoys. But getting a critical mass of developers building great software isn’t an easy task.

And while Verizon is romancing developers, the carrier isn’t as solicitous of its handset partners. Verizon’s Ryan Hughes, VP Partner Management, said in an interview Friday that the network operator’s app store will be the sole marketplace on devices sold by the company, meaning stores such as Research In Motion’s BlackBerry App World or Microsoft’s Windows Mobile Marketplace won’t get placement on Verizon handsets unless a consumer downloads them. Hughes also said that Verizon is focusing on aggregating content from four different developer communities: Windows Mobile, Palm, Android and BlackBerry.

Here’s how it will work. Hughes says developers can build applications for whatever platform they want. If they want to tie those apps to Verizon’s subscriber data for information about locations or to bill a customer, the developer needs to go through a quick approval process with Verizon and add an API to access the appropriate data. Consumers will see a Verizon app store before the close of this year, and developers can expect to learn all about this at the Verizon Developer Community Conference on July 28 in San Jose, Calif.

This is an about-face for Verizon, which has historically not laid out a welcome mat for developers. Hughes says in the past the company set the prices a developer could charge for an app running on the Verizon network. Now, Hughes said, developers will get a check, although he declined to disclose the details of a revenue-sharing program with me. He said it would be “competitive, not only with the price, but with the process and the simplicity which developers have come to expect in open ecosystems.”

I assume he means Apple’s App Store for the iPhone, which has reinvented the idea of mobile applications by making the process of consuming such apps easier on consumers, and the approach to offering them less painful for developers. Hughes never mentioned Apple by name, but he said the carrier has changed its philosophy toward application stores. He said Verizon has offered content for years using Qualcomm’s Brew platform for feature phones, but smartphones were left out. Now that smartphones are so popular with consumers rather than merely with corporate users, having applications is becoming more important, and those apps are coming from a greater number of providers.

“There’s been a huge influx in content largely due to the other app catalogs, from the middle-tier and long-tail developer community. We’ve always had deals with companies like ESPN and EA, but now there are all these mom-and-pop developers. So where there were once 20 or 40 developers that you needed to care about, now you have 100,000,” Hughes said. “Quite candidly, we didn’t have the framework to handle those applications in Brew.”

Verizon will still offer the Brew platform on its feature phones, but has now turned its energy to building out a Verizon app store for smartphones. Hughes admits these handsets are far more open than feature phones, which means that instead of approaching developers and consumers as a dictator, Verizon will have to make nice with an easy-to-use interface and quality design. We’ll see how well this goes.

For more on this topic, see our previous coverage:

Vodafone Wants to Take a Bite Out of Apple’s App Store

Telstra’s Planned App Store Is a Shift for Carriers

  1. I don’t see the logic of developing applications for VZW as it has only a small subset of total Smart Phone market. This seems to be a grab with very little to offer other than location APIs.

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    1. Stacey Higginbotham Monday, July 13, 2009

      So the pitch is that developers don’t have to build for the Verizon platform. They build for one of the four supported platforms, submit to the Verizon approval process, grab an API to get the Verizon data if they want it, and then become part of the Verizon store that ships on VZ devices. Location data and billing info are the carrot. The stick appears to be that all vz phones will ship with the VZ app store to the exclusion of all others.

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      1. The pitch is: We will block Android’s and RIM’s and Microsoft’s and everybody elses app stores and whatever you thought you can sell on those stores you will have to register with us one more time.

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      2. “don’t have to build for the Verizon platform”

        Your ‘carrot’ requires you to do a special build just for Verizon. If anything, that just increases costs all around, because you need to QA everything separately, just for Verizon.

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  2. Well, i bet Steve is quite worried about this. Probably working tonight formulating a plan to thwart Verizon. Seriously, is this some kind of joke? Is it April 1st?

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    1. So much for the iPhone on Verizon!

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  3. [...] up Verizon’s July 28 developer event, GigaOM drops the bit that Verizon’s “app store will be the sole marketplace on devices sold by the company [...]

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  4. [...] up Verizon’s July 28 developer event, GigaOM drops the bit that Verizon’s “app store will be the sole marketplace on devices sold by the company [...]

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  5. VZW has the best network but feels compelled to take draconian measures to avoid the inevitable dumb pipe status. They have always attempted to re-create the “company store” arrangement so popular in the Victorian industrial era. Unions broke the back of those benevolent overseers – net neutrality, regulatory oversight and, finally, informed consumers with choices about network value add will bring this kind of usability handcuffing to an ignominious end.

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  6. Game over Verizon, go home and be the best dumb pipe you can be….Seriously, this sounds like a Zune moment…

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    1. Mishan Aburted Tuesday, July 14, 2009

      Yeah, not just dumb pipe, but dumber pipe. My experiences establishing very simple service with both Verizon and AT&T in recent years have convinced me that they’re dysfunctional companies. No wonder everyone hates them. Let’s break ‘em up.

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  7. [...] up Verizon’s July 28 developer event, GigaOM drops the bit that Verizon’s “app store will be the sole marketplace on devices sold by the company [...]

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  8. [...] up Verizon’s July 28 developer event, GigaOM drops the bit that Verizon’s “app store will be the sole marketplace on devices sold by the company [...]

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  9. “Verizon wants to build its own app store, and is planning a July 28 event to entice developers to *its platform*”.

    Uh? What “platform” is this??

    Agree with all of the above. Why do they even bother with a press release?

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  10. this really stinks. sell me my pipe to the net and let me use it for what i want and choose for myself where my apps come from.

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  12. Was really looking forward to Android on Verizon but if they seriously plan to limit users to its subselection of Android apps, they can get bent.

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    1. More accurately: Mobile apps aren’t about native phone apps, they’re browser-based cloud computing.

      http://blogs.ft.com/techblog/2009/07/app-stores-are-not-the-future-says-google/#more-6756

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  13. [...] if you’d started busting this out a year ago when app stores were still larval, you could have convinced Google and BlackBerry and [...]

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  14. verizon, can you hear me now – YOU WOULD HAVE TO PAY ME TO WRITE APPS FOR YOU….

    APP STORE IS ABOUT CHOICE —> SOMETHING YOU ABSOLUTELY KNOW NOTHING ABOUT.

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    1. Mishan Aburted Tuesday, July 14, 2009

      We all know what you mean here, and point well taken, but I hope you also see the irony of saying “[Apple's] app store is about choice.” Apple’s screwy app approval process and exclusivity in distributing iPhone apps is definitely not about choice and not that different from what Verizon is doing here. But Apple’s built a compelling platform for developers and is more trustworthy.

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      1. Agreed, and I have not been above writing drunken frothy emails to Steve, but I was chatting with a Brew developer…

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  15. [...] appeared on Engadget on Mon, 13 Jul 2009 20:23:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.Read | Permalink | Email [...]

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  16. [...] Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments Share and Enjoy: [...]

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  17. [...] appeared on Engadget on Mon, 13 Jul 2009 20:23:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.Read | Permalink | Email [...]

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  18. [...] appeared on Engadget on Mon, 13 Jul 2009 20:23:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.Read | Permalink | Email [...]

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  19. [...] appeared on Engadget on Mon, 13 Jul 2009 20:23:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.Read | Permalink | Email [...]

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  20. [...] appeared on Engadget on Mon, 13 Jul 2009 20:23:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.Read | Permalink | Email [...]

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  21. [...] Wireless, in a last minute desperate call for help, is calling out to developers to help them get ready with the release of the new upcoming Verizon [...]

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  22. [...] Verizon wants to build its own app store – This means a program to woo developers. GigaOm lays out Verizon’s plan. [...]

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  23. Well, this should doom any chance of Verizon getting the iphone.

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  24. [...] Verizon wants to build its own app store – This means a program to woo developers. GigaOm lays out Verizon’s plan. [...]

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  25. [...] appeared on Engadget on Mon, 13 Jul 2009 20:23:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments Categories: Uncategorized [...]

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  26. [...] Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments Leave a comment Loading… @import url(“http://www.google.com/uds/css/gsearch.css”); window._uds_vbw_donotrepair = true; @import url(“http://www.google.com/uds/solutions/videobar/gsvideobar.css”); .playerInnerBox_gsvb .player_gsvb { width : 320px; height : 260px; } function LoadVideoBar() { var videoBar; var options = { largeResultSet : !true, horizontal : true, autoExecuteList : { cycleTime : GSvideoBar.CYCLE_TIME_MEDIUM, cycleMode : GSvideoBar.CYCLE_MODE_LINEAR, executeList : ["ytchannel:gamevideostrailers","ytchannel:SheepSqueal","ytchannel:SMGTUK","ytchannel:cobracody"] } } videoBar = new GSvideoBar(document.getElementById(“videoBar-bar”), GSvideoBar.PLAYER_ROOT_FLOATING, options); } // arrange for this function to be called during body.onload // event processing GSearch.setOnLoadCallback(LoadVideoBar); Related Posts and VideosNo Related Post No comments yet. [...]

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  27. [...] appeared on Engadget on Mon, 13 Jul 2009 20:23:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.Read | Permalink | Email [...]

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  28. Gotta love Verizon, the old school phone company mentality just won’t die there. They’ve been trying this for years and it’s failed miserably. Calling what ever Verizon already calls it’s on deck application market an App Store doesn’t change the crap they have

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  29. Verizon Tarzan Monday, July 13, 2009

    Verizon = FAIL. Who is the ambitious Verizon executive responsible for this goat rodeo. Clearly Verizon has too much money. The Justice Department should investigate how it is that Verizon cannot build a cost-effective, reliable, broadband digital network, but can spend time instead screwing around with me-too warmed over hash bites like this Verizon app store. What a bunch of nefarious jerks. I cannot even express my disgust with these monarchs who created WAP decks. As a rational developer, I would never consider developing anything for a Verizon appstore. Just the thought of it makes me want to hurl.

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  30. [...] Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments Loading… @import url("http://www.google.com/uds/css/gsearch.css"); window._uds_vbw_donotrepair = true; @import url("http://www.google.com/uds/solutions/videobar/gsvideobar.css"); .playerInnerBox_gsvb .player_gsvb { width : 320px; height : 260px; } function LoadVideoBar() { var videoBar; var options = { largeResultSet : !true, horizontal : true, autoExecuteList : { cycleTime : GSvideoBar.CYCLE_TIME_MEDIUM, cycleMode : GSvideoBar.CYCLE_MODE_LINEAR, executeList : ["ytchannel:theworacle","ytchannel:luckymauro","ytchannel:mttdx"] } } videoBar = new GSvideoBar(document.getElementById("videoBar-bar"), GSvideoBar.PLAYER_ROOT_FLOATING, options); } // arrange for this function to be called during body.onload // event processing GSearch.setOnLoadCallback(LoadVideoBar); Filed under: Engadget No Comments Comments (0) Trackbacks (0) ( subscribe to comments on this post ) [...]

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  31. [...] Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments Related ArticlesJuly 14, 2009 — BlackBerry Storm 2 spec’d, 3G-equipped original en route to AT&T? (0)July 14, 2009 — Oh, by the way: July 10, 2009 (0)July 14, 2009 — Skyfire for BlackBerry reaches private beta, BlackBerry browsing a little closer to not sucking (updated: nope, still alpha) (0)July 14, 2009 — LG Application Store launches, Asia-Pacific gets first dibs (0)July 14, 2009 — 7Digital to debut BlackBerry direct music downloads (0) [...]

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  32. “Was really looking forward to Android on Verizon but if they seriously plan to limit users to its subselection of Android apps, they can get bent.”

    Actually, Verizon phones will ship with the Verizon store. But, as the article says, there’s no reason you can’t download the Android App Store application and run. It just won’t automatically be installed on your phone.

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    1. And probably you won’t have permission to install Android App Store client on your Android phone either (through certificates)!!! So, you may not be able to acquire Android Store applications.

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      1. This makes a very interesting point.

        Microsoft have publically said their Windows Mobile Marketplace application won’t be end user installable. Yet if its removed from the ROM for Verizon devices, how would you install it?

        Either Microsoft allow it to be end user distributable (which would raise questions of why they won’t support marketplace on pre WM6.5 devices, and why other OS components such as Internet Explorer couldn’t be distributed in a similiar manor) or Verzion devices would be stuck without a way to install the Windows Mobile marketplace.

        I can’t see Microsoft being happy with Verizon devices knocking a small chip off the device upgrade/serviceability story Microsoft have carefully crafted over the last few years, so this will be an interesting development to watch.

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  33. [...] Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments Comments RSS Feed   Trackbacks are closed   Post a comment   Share on Twitter   Share on Facebook [...]

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  34. [...] Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments Comments (0) [...]

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  35. [...] if you’d started busting this out a year ago when app stores were still larval, you could have convinced Google and BlackBerry and [...]

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  36. VZW still continues to not get it…they want to limit and restrict their phones (bluetooth crippling, anyone?) and then wonder why people are leaving in droves to at&t/apple iPhone. Verizon lost out on the iPhone in the very beginning because they wanted strict limitations on what could and couldn’t be placed in it, and apple balked and went to at&t. AT&T is now a wildly profitable company, all because VZW is too proud and too money-hungry to see the big picture of things.

    This app store business is more of the same from america’s least progressive wireless carrier. They may have a good network, but when they continue to limit people’s choices, they’re going to find themselves losing more and more customers, and it won’t take long.

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  37. [...] if you’d started busting this out a year ago when app stores were still larval, you could have convinced Google and BlackBerry and [...]

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  38. [...] to GigaOM Verizon’s Ryan Hughes, VP Partner Management, said in an interview Friday that the network [...]

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  39. [...] if you’d started busting this out a year ago when app stores were still larval, you could have convinced Google and BlackBerry and [...]

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  40. [...] Teaser-Video und die AppStore Übersichts-Tabelle vom März taten ihr übriges. Doch bei den jetzt von Gigaom veröffentlichten Verizon-Nachrichten kann man nur noch mit dem Kopf [...]

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  41. [...] Stacey Higginbotham interviewed Verizon’s Ryan Hughes yesterday about the mobile application store that Verizon is building.  Developers will be able to build [...]

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  42. [...] GigaOM broke the news that Verizon plans to open its own app store for all the smartphones on their network. The Verizon store will carry apps for the RIM BlackBerry and Windows Mobile as the carrier currently sells phones from both of those handset makers. Verizon is expected to carry Android phones and the Palm Pre eventually so those platforms would likely get covered in the Verizon store too. The carrier feels that the inclusion of their app store on all of the handsets they carry will make it easier for customers to find the apps they need, but we have to ask, why? [...]

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  43. Verizon is one of the largest advertisers in the US. If they pull together a compelling message/campaign to promote their App Store (and have a ez to use app store and process). It is not game over – but it will be a good game to watch.

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    1. nah, the app store didn’t make the iPhone a success, the iPhone made the app store a success. People only care about the App Store because its on the iPhone. If it were on any other phone no one would give a crap about it

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      1. Not sure i totally agree. I think it they are codependent. If iPhone sucked, yep – App Store wouldnt have matter. But the bigger point is that awareness for Mobile Apps (here in the US) has been driven in large part by the iPhone and the “there’s app for that” marketing blitz. People who dont have an iPhone are trying to figure out how to get apps for their phone. So if VZ pushes heavy with the right ads for their app store – it will probably work.

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      2. @rloughery I tend to disagree, partly.

        The entire package is what makes Apple a success: iPhone, iTunes, App Store, and market awareness as one cohesive experience where ATT is the pipeline for bandwidth—they just get out of the way and rake in the cash.

        iTunes and the iPhone’s OSX interfaces provide reliable, easy and (mostly) fun experiences. The Verizon website is an epic usability nightmare, even uploading pics and video is an exercise in frustration.

        Boiling the iPhone down to advertising doesn’t take into account all the other parts that, in total, add up to one experience.

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      3. Jeff, I agree with your opinion…

        Apple’s iPhone experience was designed to eliminate the frustrations of developing and distributing applications. The candy is helpful! Verizon is attempting to reign in this success, and my opinion is that they will only succeed by eliminating choice in platform app stores.

        Good Luck, but I doubt highly that this will be a good experience. As with the Palm Pre, I’ll be watching from the sidelines!

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      4. You seem to be oblivious to a part of the market that is just as large as the iPhone. The iPod Touch has been very successful and can run almost every one of the thousands of apps in the App Store (and no huge monthly fee). The App Store would be a wild success even if the iPhone did not exist. Voice telephony is just another app whose importance is inflated for legacy reasons like fax technology and fax modems in the 90’s. It also has a relative limited future. If mobile continuous connectivity were sufficiently important to an iPod touch user then MiFi and a Verizon’s better 3G network would cost less and work better. Plus there would be no quasi-dishonest tethering charge. The MiFi device would support your laptop and any other WiFi enabled device without any additional BS AT&T ‘tax’.

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  44. [...] and some such as Verizon Wireless are already playing around with an application marketplace, according to GigaOm. Simply put, carriers have no desire to be a dumb pipe to deliver access. Apple's march could [...]

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  45. What Verizon needs to do is get the IPhone. If it did it would put AT&T out of business. On the other hand if de la Vega ever figures out that offering the IPhone at a higher price but without requiring the data plan would result in a large influx of new customers, he could cripple Verizon.

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    1. - Verizon has the best network because they don’t have the iPhone. I doubt that Verizon could handle 10 million iPhones like AT&T has to nowadays.
      – AT&T has offered the iPhone at full price w/o contract for much of its lifetime (June’07-June’08 and March’09-June’09). It never made a difference.

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      1. “AT&T has offered the iPhone at full price w/o contract for much of its lifetime”

        Yeah, probably because the phone is still locked to AT&T.

        AT&T and Apple both have been refusing to unlock the two-year-old original iPhones, even though the subsidy period (the original 2 year contract) has expired.

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  46. Verizon continues to forbid access to location data for apps like Google Maps on Blackberry and other devices. And so I fully expect to see an attempt to charge either the developer or the end user for access – initially. Given Verizon’s ostrich-like ability to ignore reality, I suspect it will be 2011 before they give up on their stranglehold on the deck, and on location data access, finally opening up. If the Android scenario plays out to its full potential, we may find ourselves in a much better world in 2011/12.

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  47. [...] Read more about this at GigaOM [...]

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  48. [...] if you’d started busting this out a year ago when app stores were still larval, you could have convinced Google and BlackBerry and [...]

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  49. Ah well. Unless Verizon starts making special exceptions, this completely stone-dumb announcement all but guarantees no iPhone for Verizon anytime in the near future, if ever.

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  50. [...] Wireless plans to open its own mobile app store and is hosting a July 28 event in San Jose to entice developers into [...]

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  51. Thanks! (I needed a good laugh today)

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  52. [...] Windows Marketplace from the device builds so that their own app store is the only one pre-loaded? Based on the initial reports, that’s exactly what’s going to happen. I wouldn’t expect Microsoft too be too [...]

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  53. hi, I’m from Vietnam. Nice to visit your blog

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  54. http://developer.windowsmobile.com/Help.aspx?id=b838a8fb-294b-434f-afec-750d3da8f75d

    Can customers, OEMs, or mobile operators remove the Windows Marketplace for Mobile client from phones?

    No. The Windows Marketplace for Mobile client is part of the Windows Mobile operating system and neither customers, manufacturers, nor mobile operators can remove it.

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  55. [...] other platforms had something similar to the App Store long before Apple, and others are still trying to copy the App Store, but Apple has clearly set the bar very high. Even though a number of [...]

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  56. [...] other platforms had something similar to the App Store long before Apple, and others are still trying to copy the App Store, but Apple has clearly set the bar very high. Even though a number of [...]

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  57. [...] other platforms had something similar to the App Store long before Apple, and others are still trying to copy the App Store, but Apple has clearly set the bar very high. Even though a number of [...]

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  58. [...] Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments [Translate] English العربية български català česky dansk Deutsch ελληνική español eesti فارسی suomi français galego עברית [...]

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  59. Sorry… to me, Verizon means crippled phones (bluetooth, USB, ringtones) and the Verizon store will feature crippled apps. They’ll be unreasonably expensive with terrible UI. User experience will be like signing up for a gym membership or buying a used car. Verizon’s real passion is saturation advertising, and their app store will just be another vector for it. If GigaOM were Verizon, I might have been charged 60 cents for this comment (440 chars = 3 SMSes)

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    1. Add to the crippled list – Wifi. VZW had been resisting that too in their smart phones.

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  60. [...] other platforms had something similar to the App Store long before Apple, and others are still trying to copy the App Store, but Apple has clearly set the bar very high. Even though a number of [...]

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  61. [...] GigaOm (7/14/2009) “Verizon (NYSE: VZ) wants to build its own app store, and is planning a July 28 event to entice developers to its platform. Like everyone else wooing programmers, the company hopes to get the equivalent of the in-crowd building the hottest apps that will elevate its store, and thus its phones and network, to the level of popularity that Apple’s iPhone currently enjoys. But getting a critical mass of developers building great software isn’t an easy task. And while Verizon is romancing developers, the carrier isn’t as solicitous of its handset partners. Verizon’s Ryan Hughes, VP Partner Management, said in an interview Friday that the network operator’s app store will be the sole marketplace on devices sold by the company, meaning stores such as Research In Motion’s BlackBerry App World or Microsoft’s Windows Mobile Marketplace won’t get placement on Verizon handsets unless a consumer downloads them” [...]

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  62. [...] אחרות, כמו Verizon, מעוניינות אף הן לאכול חלק מהעוגה ולפתוח חנות אפליקציות. אך נראה כי קצב ההתקדמות המסחרר של האפסטור משאיר להן [...]

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  63. [...] promises to provide a lucrative and simple process for its developers, Verizon vice president Ryan Hughes told GigaOM. However, the company has not disclosed details of its revenue-sharing [...]

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  64. [...] Verizon’s Unnamed App Store [...]

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  65. [...] promises to provide a lucrative and simple process for its developers, Verizon vice president Ryan Hughes told GigaOM. However, the company has not disclosed details of its revenue-sharing [...]

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  66. [...] promises to provide a lucrative and simple process for its developers, Verizon vice president Ryan Hughes told GigaOM. However, the company has not disclosed details of its revenue-sharing [...]

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  67. “He said Verizon has offered content for years using Qualcomm’s Brew platform for feature phones, but smartphones were left out. Now that smartphones are so popular with consumers rather than merely with corporate users, having applications is becoming more important, and those apps are coming from a greater number of providers.”

    So, it appears Verizon believes that GetItNow + Smartphones + minor pricing tweaks == competitor to iPhone App Store.

    I am sorry, but if they really believe this then they’ve already lost. GetItNow is a pile of crap for fundamental reasons. If they believe their experience in serving crapware to those foolish enough to pay their exhorbitant prices yields *ANY* pertinent experience then I expect this attempt to fail miserably.

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  68. Hamranhansenhansen Tuesday, July 14, 2009

    What Verizon is doing has been tried a thousand times and it amounts to blowing smoke. Developers are not impressed by business presentations.

    When Apple released the first iPhone SDK, they had been deploying iPhone applications internally for 3 years, and there were over 10 million iPhone users who all had the exact same hardware/software and all had their credit cards hooked into iTunes Store for 1-click ordering. That is like a honey pot for developers. Apple did not have to plead with them one bit. Instead of blowing smoke, Apple offered a product: a $99 end-to-end iPhone SDK that started with desktop-class software development and ended with a check for the developer. Done and done.

    Verizon has none of these things in place.

    Also Verizon is US-only, Apple is worldwide. Apple has one desktop-class OS and Verizon has 5 baby ones. Apple has one 480×320 multitouch display and Verizon has 5 different chicklet keyboards and various pointing devices and display sizes and probably styluses. Apple has a non-phone device (iPod touch) that people buy for $225 from a vending machine without contract all over the world and it runs iPhone apps, but with Verizon you only have people with smart phone data plans for $1000 per year. Apple has experience with developers and application platforms (Cocoa Mac, Carbon Mac, Mac Toolbox, Newton, Apple II) and Verizon … not so much.

    It would be better for Verizon to insist that all of the phones that it sells have HTML 5 browsers, which most of them do anyway, and encourage the upcoming age of real Web apps to start sooner rather than later. With local storage and many other things you can do in WebKit, all of which are 100% standardized, you can make some great apps that deploy on all smartphones as well as PC’s. Certainly, I have seen better apps in HTML 5 than on any mobile platform other than iPhone.

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  69. [...] 28 in order to convince them to develop for its upcoming app store.  Yes, another app store.  GigaOm’s Stacey Higginbotham spoke to Verizon’s vice president of Partner Management, Ryan Hughes, last week to wring some [...]

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  70. [...] it works out for them, it won’t [...]

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  71. [...] promises to provide a lucrative and simple process for its developers, Verizon vice president Ryan Hughes told GigaOM. However, the company has not disclosed details of its revenue-sharing [...]

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  72. [...] Read article here. VN:F [1.4.5_712]Rate this article:your vote is being cast… [...]

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  73. [...] Music totally died in 2009. They failed for the same reason all these big partnerships fail – they focus on how to lock in or how to [...]

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  74. [...] Verizon to Mobile Developers: Can You Hear Me Now? Verizon (s vz) wants to build its own app store, and is planning a July 28 event to entice developers to its platform. [...] [...]

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  75. [...] other platforms had something similar to the App Store long before Apple, and others are still trying to copy the App Store, but Apple has clearly set the bar very high. Even though a number of [...]

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  76. [...] has disclosed a number of details regarding its upcoming app store, including plans to prohibit handset makers from shipping devices with their own app portals, [...]

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  77. [...] promises to provide a lucrative and simple process for its developers, Verizon vice president Ryan Hughes told GigaOM. However, the company has not disclosed details of its revenue-sharing [...]

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  78. [...] to GigaOM Verizon’s Ryan Hughes, VP Partner Management, said in an interview Friday that the network [...]

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  79. [...] to GigaOM Verizon’s Ryan Hughes, VP Partner Management, said in an interview Friday that the network [...]

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  80. [...] Gigaom [via]: Verizon’s Ryan Hughes, VP Partner Management, said in an interview Friday that the [...]

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  81. [...] Niestety najprawdopodobniej dostęp do sklepu będą mieli tylko abonenci operatora. [Źródło:http://gigaom.com/%5D Tags: Newsy, [...]

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  82. [...] doesn’t like RIM’s App World By Tam Hanna GigaOM reports the following: …Verizon’s Ryan Hughes, VP Partner Management, said in an interview [...]

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  83. [...] Verizon is struggling at this point to get some decent phones. Exclusively having the LG Chocolate line doesn’t do them much good at all. Right now we are all aware that Verizon is pulling for their own piece of the Palm Pre but the App Catalog may not be included in this version as indicated when VP of Partner Management at Verizon Wireless, Ryan Hughes spoke of Verizon’s own applications store. [...]

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  84. [...] like it) on their network, but apparently the App Catalog is not in the cards. As reported at GigaOM, Ryan Hughes, VP of Partner Management at Verizon Wireless, said that Verizon is developing its own [...]

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  85. [...] GigaOm are reporting that Verizon Wireless is going to soon mandate handset manufacturers to install the new Verizon multi-platform application store on every device. In fact, such a portal will override the various app stores existing and forthcoming from most of Verizon’s handset partners; chiefly, Microsoft, RIM, and Palm. Additional details and speculation is available from Engadget. [...]

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  86. [...] Verizon to Mobile Developers: Can You Hear Me Now?- This news would indicate to me that a Verizon iPhone is even more unlikely. Verizon and Apple are both stubborn and are known for not making concessions to other companies. As great as the Verizon network is, as a partner they would have to make some major concessions to work with Apple. [...]

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  87. Verizon just needs to give us free apps and make phones that can support them. We paid OUR moneys for these phones and should be able to put what WE want on them without paying subs. and montly fees. Verizon truly sucks.

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  88. [...] if you’d started busting this out a year ago when app stores were still larval, you could have convinced Google and BlackBerry and [...]

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  89. The conference occurred on 7.28 but I haven’t seen any coverage on it.

    Looking at Verizon’s developer site:

    Any follow up on this? This got barely any coverage from the usual suspects.

    Looking at http://developer.verizon.com/jsps/devCenters/Network_Enablers/

    Network enablers, not sure what they are for. LBS already on many smartphones, aGPS (and Skyhook) are not new. Can’t see what Calendaring has to do with the carrier.

    I can see the rationale for a store however, since Verizon is expected to open its network to apps that pass minimum certification and this is a way for them to control the process. They promised no certification fees. I’m weary of app stores, but I don’t think Verizon’s is necessarily more evil than Apple’s, RIM et all.

    I’m struggling to see what’s new in Verizon’s API offerings. LBS is not new, smartphones use aGPS already, unless Verizon is thinking of their own proprietary Navigator as an example. Calendar, again, what does that have to do with the carrier? Maybe this was appropriate with the BREW platform but seems redundant with today’s smartphones.

    As for the store, billing is convenient but I think it’s only an incentive to the developer and could be offered as a web service. Verizon seems to want its own store to maintain some control as it opens its network to all compliant devices and applications. I think that’s a legitimate reason for a store, or really, a gateway for certifications (no certification fees).

    What I think carriers can and should is take over Push infrastructure since they maintain constant connection with the device already. But I haven’t seen any indications from carriers on this.

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  90. [...] Verizon’s App Store [...]

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  91. [...] Verizon’s App Store [...]

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  92. [...] But Verizon has smarter and farther reaching plans.  Verizon plans to host their own app store that can support every device they sell and is the ONLY place to buy on the network.  Apple’s 30% take of all app store sales is beyond desirable and Verizon plans to have a similar setup for themselves. The idea that Verizon would give up their margins or Apple would give up theirs both sacrificing the all important customer experience is unlikely. “the network operator’s app store will be the sole marketplace on devices sold by the company, meaning stores such as Research In Motion’s BlackBerry App World or Microsoft’s Windows Mobile Marketplace won’t get placement on Verizon handsets unless a consumer downloads them”                                                         Higginbotham  [...]

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  93. [...] up Verizon’s July 28 developer event, GigaOM drops the bit that Verizon’s “app store will be the sole marketplace on devices sold by the company [...]

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  94. [...] mind an approval process, but Verizon is shooting itself in the foot.There are rumors this may change, but innovation is [...]

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  95. [...] other hand, isn’t ready for Steve’s rule; the company made it clear they want to set up their own App Store for all mobile devices they’ll bless. Understandably, Verizon want to stay in control, they [...]

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  96. [...] just launched its Windows Marketplace for Mobile and Verizon, which is trying to lure developers to its own app store due to open later this year, in the meantime has announced it will launch Android-based devices preloaded with apps, and access [...]

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  97. [...] Verizon is opening its own app store later this year [...]

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  98. [...] Verizon Buries Windows Marketplace install file. This was confirmed by Verizon rep quoted HERE. [...]

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  99. [...] not only told developers what they could sell, but how much they could charge. The company is currently planning a new store that, while not technically excluding competitors, aggregates content under its own [...]

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  100. [...] and they aren’t going to let device manufacturers into the pockets of their customer base. With over 3,500 developers already signed up to publish to Verizon, not to mention the incredible power Verizon offers in the way of valuable access to cell phone [...]

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  101. [...] Verizon is smart to create an online payment platform that it can offer its 91.2 million wireless subscribers, but getting people to use it will be a challenge. If Verizon can get people accustomed to putting in their phone numbers instead of credit cards while  shopping online, then it could own a critical element in building an application and services platform that spans the wired and wireless world. Much like Apple has such a large stake in the mobile application and commerce space today because it has millions of credit cards in iTunes, Verizon could be expanding its own payments information for a similar goal. [...]

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  102. [...] certification process has been notoriously slow, and Verizon has said that its upcoming app store will be the sole marketplace on handsets it sells — meaning customers looking to shop at Research In Motion’s App [...]

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  103. [...] is going to open a VCAST app store for phones that run Android 2.2. We first covered this news over a year ago, when Verizon told us they were going to open the store for not just Android, but for BlackBerry, [...]

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  104. [...] would not be pre-loaded onto Verizon devices, Ryan Hughes, VP Partner Management for Verizon, told GigaOm. Instead, users would have to download an Android Market application to buy apps outside of V CAST. [...]

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