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Summary:

This tidbit has me scratching my head. Stacey Higginbotham shares news that Nokia is planning to offer an ARM-powered netbook next year, according to an analyst research note published today. That’s not all that surprising to me, although the company’s core competency is in handsets. Nokia […]

android-netbookThis tidbit has me scratching my head. Stacey Higginbotham shares news that Nokia is planning to offer an ARM-powered netbook next year, according to an analyst research note published today. That’s not all that surprising to me, although the company’s core competency is in handsets. Nokia has tested the ultra-portable market with its Internet Tablets running Maemo, but it’s more of a handset maker and service provider.

No, the surprising part is what operating system the alleged netbook will run. Would you believe it to be Google Android? It’s not the fact that a netbook will run on Android that gets me. I’ve been calling for that since last year and we’ve seen a few prototypes already. But where does Maemo fit into Nokia’s non-phone plans? Perhaps it doesn’t, and will eventually move onto handsets. And what about the recently announced Nokia relationship with Intel?

If this turns out to be true, I don’t think it will be a huge win for Nokia in the long run. By next year, I expect several Android netbooks on the market, so a Nokia device would just be another fish in the pond. Now if Nokia can differentiate its Android netbook by integrating its Ovi and N-Gage services, that’s a different story.

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  1. Since Android and Maemo are both Linux based, its very possible that the two could be merged in some way. Certainly Nokia’s expertise developed with Maemo can be leveraged to improve Android, and any expertise they develop working with Android can be leveraged back into Maemo.

    In the open source world, some times one project will gain much more support than another similar project. That doesn’t mean the less used project isn’t useful though, and often it will be mined for good ideas, if not outright merged with the more accepted project.

    This kind of thing seems very normal to me.

    Hans

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