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Summary:

At his confirmation hearing this afternoon, Julius Genachowski, the nominee for the chair of the Federal Communications Commission, spoke out in favor of using spectrum creatively for providing mobile broadband. In response to questions by Sen. Maria Cantwell on how he planned to handle decision-making around […]

julius-genachowski-thumb1At his confirmation hearing this afternoon, Julius Genachowski, the nominee for the chair of the Federal Communications Commission, spoke out in favor of using spectrum creatively for providing mobile broadband. In response to questions by Sen. Maria Cantwell on how he planned to handle decision-making around white spaces broadband, Genachowski said he “applauds the creative use of spectrum,” and went on to laud mobile broadband technology. Whites spaces broadband is an effort to provide broadband in the spectrum that exists between the digital television channels.

Given that the biggest change to the way we surf the web over the past few years has been our ability to do it on the go, his emphasis on finding more ways to use the spectrum is one that is critically important to technology innovation. Combine his attitude with efforts from Sen. John Kerry and Sen. Olympia Snowe to pass a spectrum inventory bill, and we may not have to spend as much time fretting over exclusivity arrangements and high texting charges in the near future, because we can allocate more spectrum to wireless broadband that may not be dominated by the wireless operators.

  1. a part of the spectrum should be allocated for the use of a national medical internet network.
    another assigned for our national transit system.
    darpa should have reserved space as well,
    but there should be many discussions that occur before that decision.

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  2. [...] Google has the right idea. To get you started here are Google’s ideas, our ideas and even more ideas. Now go make your voice [...]

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  3. [...] of regulatory affairs at CTIA, a trade group that represents the wireless industry, about the issue of spectrum allocation. He thinks the need to get spectrum into the pipeline is reaching a crisis point. “In [...]

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  4. [...] The industry has recently spent a lot of time pondering how to make more spectrum available for wireless broadband services, mostly because the wireless companies and others in the industry believe the nation is woefully short on airwaves to deliver the mobile web. Various estimates suggest that the U.S. needs 150-400 MHz more of spectrum within the next year. Right now, we have about 409 MHz available and about 50 MHz in the pipeline, according to the CTIA. There may be a shortfall, but before the FCC concedes this, it must open up a comment period. In its request for comments it also points out that it has asked in an earlier Notice of Inquiry for ways to make the existing spectrum more efficient. [...]

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