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Summary:

Google Android handset owners can expect eReader availability in “mid- to late summer,” according to TeleRead. They spoke to Scott Pendergrast of Fictionwise, which is owned by Barnes & Noble. The company’s “eReader everywhere” plans to conquer the handheld world don’t stop with Android, either. It’s […]

classic_2009-09-06_070747Google Android handset owners can expect eReader availability in “mid- to late summer,” according to TeleRead. They spoke to Scott Pendergrast of Fictionwise, which is owned by Barnes & Noble.

The company’s “eReader everywhere” plans to conquer the handheld world don’t stop with Android, either. It’s prepping to support the Palm Pre natively so that folks don’t have to drop $30 for the Classic emulator and use the PalmOS version of eReader (shown).

While I’m thrilled to hear this news, I also want to see Amazon create a Kindle app for all of the various handset platforms. The ability to read on the Kindle and then pick up where I left off on an iPhone makes it so easy to read everywhere. I’d like to see that same literary joy come to Windows Mobile, Android, S60 and the Pre.

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  1. Too bad the ebook publishers are already screaming bloody murder over Amazon bringing Kindle tot he iPhone. Based on that reaction it seems unlikely Amazon can move rapidly to bring Kindle to Pre or Android. :-(

  2. Mobile Developer Tuesday, June 23, 2009

    There are a ton of e-readers for windows mobile to even include the web browser. However, have you ever tried to read for any length of time on a 3 inch display. Come on… I have a 2nd generation kindle with a 9 inch display and even that gets old after a while. Let’s be clear, e-readers or similar products are for emergency viewing only and that is exactly the scope, noting more, nothing less.

  3. “e-readers…are for emergency viewing only…” – That is simply not true. I have read books exclusively on a Palm device for almost a decade. And I read 2-3 novels (and a magazine) per month. That is many hours a day, all on a “3 inch display”.

    I now find heavy dead tree books to be awkward. It is just what you are used to. Also, with eReader, you can search for text and look up words by tapping them. Not to mention carry hundreds of books everywhere you go.

    I cannot wait for a Pre eReader. I don’t like using the eReader in the emulator.

  4. O’Reilly’s bookworkm (http://bookworm.oreilly.com/) has been a fantastic stop-gap measure for me. I convert my non-drm ebooks to ePub format using the free program calibre. You do have to have a web-connection to read the books, but I am thinking that pre-opening the chapters before I need to cut off the connection may work as well. You can also set it to open to the last chapter your read.

    Not perfect, but I prefer it over the Classic method.

    -Erica

  5. I own a good colection of paper books however if i could get them in digital format on android though kindle it would be awesome i would stop buying paper books. its the green way to go.

  6. Well, it’s December, we know nook uses android as its platform, and yet still no android mobile version of the B&N ereader. Anyone know why?

  7. You don’t need to install calibre just for the converter anymore. There is an online converter http://2epub.com

  8. I just wanted to point out that Kindle is having an app added to the Android Market soon. Here is the link:
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html?ie=UTF8&docId=165849822

    At this link, you can give them your email in order to be notified when it is available. Hopefully in the next couple of weeks!

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