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Summary:

To be precise (well, at least to the nearest thousand), Americans streamed 16,785,432,000 videos in April, according to comScore. That’s up 16 percent from March to what we believe is a new all-time record. While the number of U.S. video viewers continues to hold at something […]

To be precise (well, at least to the nearest thousand), Americans streamed 16,785,432,000 videos in April, according to comScore. That’s up 16 percent from March to what we believe is a new all-time record. While the number of U.S. video viewers continues to hold at something like 78 percent of the country’s Internet population, the number of videos they’re watching continues to soar.

comscoreaprilhulu

These numbers come courtesy of Hulu (that’s why it’s highlighted above), which once again has made its own copy of comScore’s monthly video report public. Hulu itself saw the number of its streams grow 4.4 percent in April, for a total of 397 million. Meanwhile the juggernaut Google (aka YouTube) somehow grew 15 percent by comScore’s measure, for 6.8 billion streams. That gives YouTube 40.7 percent market share.

Of course, video measurement is an evolving science, so we can’t get too hung up on the month-to-month measurements (though we’re hoping to spell out a little more about how these analytics work in a piece later this week).

Of the 151.8 million U.S. users who watched video on at least one site in April, Google claimed 107.9 million of them. On average, users spent 384.7 minutes each watching video during the month, an especially interesting stat in light of a separate, observational report released recently that found people tend to overreport their video usage. But the comScore numbers are based on direct measurement of panels and streams, so there’s no opportunity for people to try to sound “cool” by saying they watch more web video than they actually do, as the report had suggested.

In other recent stats drama, while Hulu likes comScore’s take enough to send it to the media, apparently it’s not so hot on Nielsen’s. It’s pretty obvious why: Nielsen said the site had 7.4 million visitors in April, down from the month before, while comScore said it had 40 million. Hulu subsequently asked Nielsen to please get its act together in a letter that got picked up by the New York Times.

Hulu placed third and YouTube first in terms of total streams for the month. Fox Interactive Media (aka MySpace), with 512.8 million streams, came in second.

  1. [...] results come at the same time comScore video data for April shows a 16% increase in video watched online vs the month before. comScore found that [...]

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  2. Cripes! Look at the number for minutes per viewer.

    No wonder U.S. productivity is in decline.

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  3. why does watching videos so popular nowadays?

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  4. [...] You Pay for Hulu, and if So, How Much? Hulu’s popularity continues to climb (at least according to comScore), but that growth could soon hit a (pay) wall if recent talk by News Corp. and NBC come to pass. [...]

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  5. [...] results come at the same time comScore video data for April shows a 16% increase in video watched online vs the month before. comScore found that [...]

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  6. [...] Hulu is co-owned by News Corp., NBC Universal, and Disney. According to ComScore, the site’s traffic has soared in recent [...]

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  7. [...] meanwhile, YouTube’s audience and content library just keep blowing up the charts. And TV streamer Hulu, just a gleam in NBC and [...]

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  8. Despite the measurement controversies, online video consumption is growing. That is undeniable. YouTube has taught people to watch video online, and major networks have learned that streaming video episodes don’t cannibalize TV traffic, but actually strengthen the audience base. Others such as MLB.com have figured out how to have a profitable subscription business. In the future, it is clear that Hulu and others like them will have a blend of subscription and advertising supported business models to essentially provide an “online cable company.” Will that cause a hiccup in viewership? Perhaps, but consumers love their content and are now hooked. We discuss topics related to online video at http://www.inlethd.com

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  9. [...] importance of integrating YouTube into your investor relations programs, then look no further than this recent report issued by NewTeeVee.   The report states that “Americans streamed 16,785,432,000 videos in April, according to [...]

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  10. [...] this month it may be happy to learn that Nielsen thinks they’re back up to 10.1 million (comScore of course thinks the site’s unique viewer count is more like 40 [...]

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