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Summary:

A district judge has ordered YouTube to pay $1.61 million in royalties to U.S. songwriters, and $70,000 per month going forward. The judgment came last Wednesday in New York, but we didn’t see coverage of it until today when Techdirt picked it up; there was an […]

A district judge has ordered YouTube to pay $1.61 million in royalties to U.S. songwriters, and $70,000 per month going forward. The judgment came last Wednesday in New York, but we didn’t see coverage of it until today when Techdirt picked it up; there was an earlier report on Law360 that you can read if you register. Songwriters, like everyone else, want a piece of YouTube; for instance the co-writer of Rick Astley’s “Never Gonna Give You Up” recently claimed he’s been exploited by the “rickrolling” phenomenon, only earning £11 from Google for his trouble.

The particulars of the fee are only temporary as YouTube and ASCAP go to trial over blanket licenses for ASCAP’s songs in a case brought last May. As Techdirt describes it,

“The court seemed to take a ‘split the difference’ approach, as ASCAP had asked for $12 million for all music streamed between 2005 and the end of 2008 (and another $7 million for 2009). YouTube, in response, had suggested $79,500 for 2005 through the end of 2008 and then $20,000 per quarter ongoing. The court rejected both proposals, and dinged both companies for weakly supporting their positions, or being somewhat misleading in their assertions.”

Either way or somewhere in between, YouTube will be paying songwriters on a regular basis going forward. And it’s just one more expense for the site that’s been widely dinged for its lack of revenue. ASCAP represents some 350,000 U.S. composers, songwriters, lyricists and music publishers.

While YouTube recently announced a joint venture with Universal Music Group called Vevo, other music rights groups have pulled their work off the site after unsuccessful contract negotiations, including Warner Music Group, the UK’s Performing Rights Society and German royalty collections group GEMA.

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  1. Mel Phillips Now & Then » Blog Archive » Just 18 More Signatures Needed For A Majority… Wednesday, May 20, 2009

    [...] for passage of the Local Radio Freedom Act with 18 more autographs but they better hurry.  Just last week YouTube was ordered by a New York district judge to fork over $1.61 million in royalties to U.S. [...]

  2. The Online Video Producer Blog Wednesday, May 20, 2009

    Well, if it was not for the rickrolling phenomenon no one would be speaking of Rick Astley anymore, so he should be grateful to youtube for the publicity rather than have ASCAP sue them.

    I am sure a lot of other forgotten artists would like to be rolled.

  3. Article doesn’t say anything about Rick Astley having ASCAP sue anyone.

  4. Roundup: YouTube must pay songwriters, Queen Rania loves Twitter, and more » VentureBeat Thursday, May 21, 2009

    [...] ordered to pay $1.6M to US songwriters — The fees are only temporary as YouTube and the ASCAP songwriters association go to court to reach a more [...]

  5. TechDozer » Roundup: YouTube must pay songwriters, Queen Rania loves Twitter, and more Thursday, May 21, 2009

    [...] ordered to pay $1.6M to US songwriters — The fees are only temporary as YouTube and the ASCAP songwriters association go to court to reach a more [...]

  6. Embedding a YouTube Video May Cost You a Bundle in ASCAP Bills [Copyfight] | Newstion.com Wednesday, July 8, 2009

    [...] Video May Cost You a Bundle in ASCAP Bills [Copyfight] Wednesday, July 8, 2009 Fresh off a court victory against Google’s YouTube, ASCAP tells us it is setting its sights on users of the [...]

  7. Embedding a YouTube Video May Cost You a Bundle in ASCAP Bills | Tech-monkey.info Blogs Wednesday, July 8, 2009

    [...] off a court victory against Google’s YouTube, ASCAP tells us it is setting its sights on users of the [...]

  8. Embedding a YouTube Video May Cost You a Bundle « Ancavge Thursday, July 9, 2009

    [...] off a court victory against Google’s YouTube, ASCAP tells us it is setting its sights on users of the video-sharing [...]

  9. ASCAP wants users to pay for embedded YouTube videos Friday, July 10, 2009

    [...] information out to people without them having to click extra links to find the video.  Now, after winning in court against YouTube, ASCAP wants regular users to pay for embedded videos on their sites. ASCAP [...]

  10. SparkleTags.Com Monday, August 24, 2009

    Well the sad thing about this is that now they are going after small sites that have youtube videos on them.. I’m sure Myspace is going to be the next big one in line…

    What is really sad is that I’m sure no songwriter will see any of that money…

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