2 Comments

Summary:

If you, like so many of us these days, are trying to get more out of Twitter, you may want to register for next week’s free, hour-long O’Reilly “Twitter Power Tips” webcast, being held Thursday, May 21 at 10 a.m. PDT. Hosted by Tim O’Reilly and […]

twitter_logo_headerIf you, like so many of us these days, are trying to get more out of Twitter, you may want to register for next week’s free, hour-long O’Reilly “Twitter Power Tips” webcast, being held Thursday, May 21 at 10 a.m. PDT.

Hosted by Tim O’Reilly and Sarah Milstein, co-authors of “The Twitter Book,” the webcast will feature key tips and real-life examples from power users. The presentation will be followed by an attendee Q&A session.

I’ve attended a couple of previous O’Reilly webcasts; they’re high-quality presentations with respected speakers that typically impart a good deal of useful information. There is an archive of previous webcasts on the O’Reilly web site if you’d like to check out past sessions, too.

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  1. Charles McPhate Friday, May 15, 2009

    Thanks for the post. I’m a Twitter newbie, and this is just what I need.

  2. Frank Leibold Sunday, May 17, 2009

    A new carer paradigm

    Career scholars and theorists have over the past 15 years described significant changes taking place in
    America’s workforce and how they’re impacting employees in all occupations.

    1.- Employees now face “boundaryless”careers – that involve drastic transitions where employees will have five-six distinct careers and over a dozen different jobs. And…

    2.- These employees will also have to navigate protean oriented careers – where the employee, not the company, takes responsibility for their own career management. And…

    3. – Organizations of all stripes – business, government and education – are adopting a new form of work performance measures called competencies.

    The confluence of these three major career changes will add additional uncertainty to an already
    insecure American workforce. But more importantly, employees are now assuming the new responsibility for managing their own multiple career transitions with new workplace performance measures, thus creating a new employability paradigm – which will require new training regimens,
    selected career path assignments, and the development of a universal career competency model in order to succeed.

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