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Summary:

Google’s participation in the cloud relies less on offering raw computing power and more on offering applications such as email and a platform for coders to use. Depending on your point of view, Google has chosen to offer one of the simpler cloud experiences or is […]

appengine_lowresGoogle’s participation in the cloud relies less on offering raw computing power and more on offering applications such as email and a platform for coders to use. Depending on your point of view, Google has chosen to offer one of the simpler cloud experiences or is exercising draconian levels of control. But one way or another, Google wants to convince developers and enterprises to use its App Engine platform in order to promote adoption of its services inside the enterprise.

App Engine debuted in May 2008 as a coding platform geared toward smaller web startups building applications. It only supported the Python programming language, was free, and didn’t allow users to consume of a lot of resources without permission. Google started charging developers to use App Engine three months ago, and earlier this month added to it support for Java, a programming language popular in the corporate world.

App Engine is Google’s attempt to offer a platform as a service — what we think of as the middle ground inside the cloud. If software as a service is dinner at a restaurant and infrastructure as a service is making a meal at home using pre-prepped food from the grocery, then platforms as a service are the semi-convenient middle ground, where you go to put a selection of pre-cut and pre-prepared vegetables together to make a bunch of meals. You have some ability to customize, but there are still limits to what you can make with the choices provided.

The premise of these platforms is they take away the complexity of managing a bunch of actual machines (even if they are in the cloud), but still allow developers to build customized programs. However, with that simplicity comes a loss of control. Some developers dislike the way App Engine requires them to handle data and have complaints over the proprietary nature of the standards Google uses, which means that apps built in App Engine won’t easily port to another platform.

Mike Repass, a program manager for App Engine, acknowledges the complaints, but defends those limits, saying that the way Google forces programmers to code is a function of the company being concerned about scale. Google’s expertise, after all, is in scaling out applications to millions of users without a hitch. A key question will be whether corporate IT wants to lock itself in and change the way it codes for the sake of easy scaling (a feature that may not be as important when building an application designed for internal use).

Google will compete with platforms as a service from Microsoft and Rackspace. Both Google and Microsoft are also planning to use their platforms to create deeper ties between their software products and the custom apps built on the platforms, much like Salesforce.com has created Force.com or Intuit has Quickbase. However, Google and Microsoft will support programs that have no relation at all to their own products.

Repass says the goal is to offer existing corporate customers of Google’s software products, like Google Docs and Gmail, the opportunity to build on top of them. The custom programs will abide by the same compliance and authorization rules the existing Google Apps use, Repass says. Since the next battle over enterprise software is going to be fought in the cloud, Google is beefing up its platform as a service to wield as a weapon against its rivals.

This article also appeared on BusinessWeek.com.

  1. Stacey – I loved your analogy of the food preparation! It sounds like with App Engine, Google will optimize for developing on top of the Google stack but you are on your own if you want to venture out. One possible reason they might want to establish development boundaries would be so those enhanced extensions would run on Android and also on future Netbooks running App Engine apps and Android Linux. Not sure we can get the whole story right now.

    http://lopezunwired.com
    http://twitter.com/lopezunwired

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  2. I’m wondering what Google’s ToS will look like for their cloud services. Everything google maintains some rights to access your data to better sell you stuff. Indeed, they often get stuck having to change their ToS because they want to reserve too many rights to YOUR content. Personally, I believe your private data (application code, application data, customers, database) is better off over at Amazon. :)

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  3. I’m wondering what Google’s ToS will look like for their cloud services. Everything google maintains some rights to access your data to better sell you stuff. Indeed, they often get stuck having to change their ToS because they want to reserve too many rights to YOUR content. Personally, I believe your private data (application code, application data, customers, database) is better off over at Amazon. :)
    Sorry… forgot to say great post – can’t wait to read your next one!

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  4. Hi Stacey,

    I like the food prep analogy as well. I think of cloud platforms as offering two distinct characteristics. The first is that cloud platforms offer a *framework* and is what many people think of with PaaS. But the second and perhaps more powerful characteristic is that of *abstraction*. You mention both in your article, but I think the food prep example doesn’t do justice to the abstraction piece.

    The alternative to hosted cloud platforms (PaaS) is the enterprise, or self-hosted platform such as Appistry’s CloudIQ Platform. These offer the abstraction and framework without the lack of portability and lock-in of offerings like App Engine. And you can have your cake and eat it too by using one of these platforms on an IaaS cloud offering like Amazon EC2 or GoGrid.

    Finally there is the issue of whether or not Google gets the enterprise and its needs. I addressed this in a post the other day in response to the flap about public vs private clouds:

    http://www.appistry.com/blogs/sam/yes-google-we-know-exactly-what-you-mean

    Thanks,
    Sam
    http://twitter.com/samcharrington

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  5. I wonder if Google App Engine(tm) is another sign of Google Arrogance(tm). Who in their right mind would implement a non-trivial application on a proprietary platform (in Python!) and risk being locked in when Google loses interest and lets its product languish like so many others in its stable?

    Are there interesting examples of apps that are using App Engine?

    Even Microsoft’s .NET/C# allows gives you many hosting options, including Amazon’s EC2.

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  6. [...] Google Aims to Woo the Enterprise With Its Cloud (GigaOM) [...]

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  7. [...] will be worth $34 billion in the coming years. Google is also pushing into this space with its Google Apps and other enterprise efforts. But Microsoft isn’t going to sit still while interlopers try to infringe on its business. [...]

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