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Summary:

As fast 3G service gains customers, some devices are just fine with slower 2G speeds. Take Tunstall’s RTX3371 Wireless Telehealth Monitor, for example. The device just cleared the U.S. FDA and uses a slower GPRS cellular radio to receive and send data. Vital signs are wirelessly […]

prnjdisplayimageservletAs fast 3G service gains customers, some devices are just fine with slower 2G speeds. Take Tunstall’s RTX3371 Wireless Telehealth Monitor, for example. The device just cleared the U.S. FDA and uses a slower GPRS cellular radio to receive and send data.

Vital signs are wirelessly collected from other compatible devices like weight scales and blood pressure units; the stats can then be forwarded on to doctors or hospitals by using the integrated cellular radio. As if that  weren’t enough, the RTX3371 offers voice functionality for questionnaires on how a patient is feeling. Sounds good for the patient, but I suspect this type of technology is only going to give my doctor more time to golf. ;)

  1. More time to golf… no, maybe more of a headache. We use a centralized monitoring system in the hospital I work at and the amount of false alarms – all of which are checked on immediately – is pretty high. So, when grandma gets tired of the tight cuff on her arm, itchy ECG pads, or that newfangled gadget, the doctor gets a call…and somebody has to check on it.
    Yes, big brother IS watching…

    David

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  2. Hi Dave TN, great point. It’s disappointing that you feel this way about home monitoring technology but we’re seeing this a lot when the implementation is poor.

    Let’s not throw the baby out with the bathwater though – maybe you could suggest that your Hospital thinks about outsourcing this new business to a company that has experience and specialization in this new field.

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