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Summary:

With AT&T’s exclusivity on the iPhone nearing an end next year, Apple (NSDQ: AAPL) appears to be playing the field. USA Today is reporting t…

imageWith AT&T’s exclusivity on the iPhone nearing an end next year, Apple (NSDQ: AAPL) appears to be playing the field. USA Today is reporting that Verizon Wireless (NYSE: VZ) and Apple are considering making an iPhone that would be ready for Verizon’s network as early as next year, according to people familiar with the situation.

The unidentified sources said the two companies entered “high-level” discussions a few months ago when CEO Steve Jobs was still overseeing day-to-day business. And, even though Jobs is on medical leave until June, the conversations have continued. Meanwhile, AT&T’s exclusivity is rumored to end sometime next year, something the WSJ reported that CEO Randall Stephenson is working hard at extending until 2011. It’s no surprise that the iPhone is a hot commodity among wireless carriers. Last week, AT&T (NYSE: T), beat expectations, boosted in part by the iPhone. More on our sister site mocoNews.

  1. If VZ and AAPL make an agreement for IPhone sales will this add to the traffic that ATT is experiencing? Will the "winner" be the consumer and the ISP's?

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  2. I hate AT&T and their service/coverage so much, I won't even consider an iPhone until some other carrier picks up the service. It would be in Apples best interest to let everyone provide the service for the iPhone. Competition is a good thing in this arena. And if other carriers don't have the infastructure to support it, ….."build it, and they will come".

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  3. Choice is good. Several Carriers fighting each other to get the iPhone is great. But, Verizon's CDMA will be slower than 3G and their customer service and nickel and dime pricing strategies don't live up to the Apple Standard. As a long time customer and stockholder in both companies, I think Verizon will have to come a long long way to change their sales and service culture to make the customer experience anywhere near Apple's standard.

    Example: Walk into a Verizon store for help and you have to sign in at a Kiosk and join one of three Ques even before you can talk to anyone. (moo moo) There are always three or four times as many salespeople than tech or repair people. Trying to get an honest price on a phone and determine what after purchase costs will affect your plan is impossible to decipher without spending a lot of time with a pushy salesperson trying to get you to buy more phone services than you really need. And finally, after this grueling process you get the first bill and can't figure out why your paying $20 a month more than you were told. Go to the website and be totally confused before having to find 3 consecutive links to get to view your account info while being bombarded with advertisement. Whew! See what I mean?

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