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Summary:

Earlier this week, Minneapolis-based software company NetEx released a cloud-specific version of its HyperIP solution. HyperIP represents technology originally designed for high-speed satellite communications other high-latency, high-packet-loss networks redesigned to work with IP. Now, the product can run with pretty much any application — including backup […]

hyperip_rgbEarlier this week, Minneapolis-based software company NetEx released a cloud-specific version of its HyperIP solution. HyperIP represents technology originally designed for high-speed satellite communications other high-latency, high-packet-loss networks redesigned to work with IP. Now, the product can run with pretty much any application — including backup or replication software — that needs to move large amounts of data over a WAN.

NetEx is not a moment too soon in bringing this technology to the cloud, where transfers of large data sets are becoming more and more prevalent. Backing up primary storage in the cloud can be a great option for protecting data, but it isn’t too helpful if you need that data moved in a hurry but are constrained by Internet download/upload speeds. HyperIP boosts transfer speeds up to 800 Mbps, and with its Recovery on Demand feature gives customers 10 days of unlimited bandwidth at the same high speed to recover data in the case of a failure. HyperIP also lets users customize facets of their data transfer to optimize flow, such as scheduling transfers to and from the cloud in the evening when the network might not be as busy.

HyperIP for Cloud, which is designed for cloud-to-customer transfers instead of intracompany transfers, ships as a VMware appliance and is sold through resellers, including managed service providers and storage companies with cloud backup and disaster recovery offerings. The standard HyperIP solution is sold as a software appliance. NetEx VP of Business Development and Marketing Bob MacIntyre said EMC is the biggest reseller right now.

Although NetEx is new to the cloud space, it’s not new to data transfer. The company was spun off from StorageTek in 1999 and brought with the HyperIP technology and a stable of big-time customers. MacIntyre said HyperIP users span the globe, and include the IRS, Bank of America and many telcos. As more companies backup important data in the cloud, products like HyperIP should gain traction with cloud service providers who want not only improve their offerings, but also to differentiate themselves from the competition.

  1. Alan Wilensky Friday, April 24, 2009

    We are just starting to see companies like this that will, eventually, allow underwriters to offer client coverage for cloud continuity and business operations. A few more pieces have to fall into place, one being blind, trusted API brokerage services that will allow machine images and transaction logs to be be hot shipped and restarted. Such a blind API trust would ahve to be run by an independent industry pool funded by the underwriters.

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