3 Comments

Summary:

Whenever I write that headline, I am reminded of the movie “Groundhog Day.” Today, Omid Kordestani, Google’s president of global sales operations and business development, is leaving the job that position and instead will advise Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin and CEO Eric Schmidt. […]

Omid Kordestani

Omid Kordestani

Whenever I write that headline, I am reminded of the movie “Groundhog Day.” Today, Omid Kordestani, Google’s president of global sales operations and business development, is leaving the job that position and instead will advise Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin and CEO Eric Schmidt. (Google spokesperson just emailed to let us know that Omid is staying on with the company in a full-time capacity and is still on company’s operating committee.) He is being replaced by Nikesh Arora, currently the head of Google’s EMEA business. Earlier this month, Sukhinder Singh Cassidy, Google’s president for Asian Pacific and Latin American operations, quit the company. Tim Armstrong, senior VP of sales at Google, left the company to be the CEO of AOL.

The news of Omid’s shift of responsibilities exit has been overshadowed by a 3 percent sequential decline in Google’s revenues. Many of our readers have said this talent leakage is not such a big deal, as it allows people a chance of upward mobility. While that might be true, I think when management at such senior level leaves the company, its operations and sales are disrupted. Much of business — and I speak with some first-hand knowledge — is about relationships, and when folks leave, relationships, and the operations they support, are disrupted. Turnover in senior ranks also can catalyze a change in the chemistry of a company. These are some of the challenges facing Google.

Here is a statement from Google spokesperson:

He’ll spend his time focused on developing new businesses for Google, revenue opportunities, reviewing possible acquisitions and partnerships that may take Google’s business into new areas, etc.  A much more strategic role (as opposed to the day-to-day management requirements that come along with overseeing a several thousand person organization).  He’ll also now finally have the time to do some other things outside the office that are important to him — e.g. philanthropy, advising other young companies/entrepreneurs, etc.

 

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  1. courtney benson Thursday, April 16, 2009

    Sometimes senior managers know the best time to leave – when value is eroding they take the hit, even if it’s not their fault. Losses from these recent departures could have negative consequences for sure.

  2. courtney benson Friday, April 17, 2009

    Sometimes senior managers know the best time to leave – when value is eroding they take the hit, even if it’s not their fault. Losses from these recent departures could have negative consequences for sure.
    OH! You’re my new favorite blogger fyi

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