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Summary:

Google (NSDQ: GOOG) CEO Eric Schmidt cautioned during the company’s earnings call Thursday that despite the company’s solid quarterly result…

Google (NSDQ: GOOG) CEO Eric Schmidt cautioned during the company’s earnings call Thursday that despite the company’s solid quarterly results, “we’re still basically in uncharted territory” when it comes to the economy. So far, he said, the benefits of the growing move toward online advertising had outweighed the negative impact of the economic slowdown on Google’s results. While revenue was down slightly compared to last quarter, it was up compared to a year ago. Schmidt also said that the next two quarters would be typically weaker due to seasonal trends.

Highlights from the call after the jump, including Schmidt’s comments on Twitter.

Twitter: Schmidt said that the service proved that “innovation is alive and well” in Silicon Valley. “Without commenting specifically about Twitter … you could imagine that … it could be a channel for product information, marketing information, real-time information for which you can hang advertising products, whether it

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  1. ………Interesting

  2. Interesting? Or hypocritical… After so many years of an active campaign against premium content and micropayments (remember Mr. Shirky's "theory" that micropayments will never work bcs people hate being nickel-and-dimed?), after so much noise against online content as something that matters and has to be paid for — now Google "considers" micropayments and paid subscription models. Hypocrites!

  3. free virtual worlds for kids Tuesday, April 21, 2009

    I think the "micropayments" and "other forms of subscription models" only refers to the YouTube side of the business. As they continue to link up with studios, possibly to provide more online media content (from big-name studios), Google would have to pay some kind of subscription to the studios in order to stream content from these studios. Of course whether the cost of subscription to the content should go to the end-user or not is to be debated.

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