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True Knowledge, an innovative semantic answer engine that’s currently in closed beta, opened its API today. If you’re a developer, the API offers the enticing possibility of adding knowledge-based functionality to your apps. Answer engines are different from search engines in that they provide answers to […]

tk_logoTrue Knowledge, an innovative semantic answer engine that’s currently in closed beta, opened its API today. If you’re a developer, the API offers the enticing possibility of adding knowledge-based functionality to your apps.

Answer engines are different from search engines in that they provide answers to questions, rather than the ability to search for keywords in content. The True Knowledge application is a combination of an interpreter (which examines your query and turns it into a form that the app can use) and a knowledge base, which is expanded by its users over time. With a comprehensive enough knowledge base, True Knowledge should be able to answer nearly any question thrown at it.

While Google and other Internet search engines are good at searching existing web content, True Knowledge attempts to answer tricky queries such as “Is the Eiffel Tower older than St. Paul’s Cathedral?” or “Who was U.S. president when Obama was a teenager?” Finding answers to these types of questions usually takes several steps to get all the required facts with a traditional search engine, so a semantic answer engine should be a real time-saver and a helpful complement to existing search technology. Results gleaned from True Knowledge’s closed beta are often impressive, although there are some gaps in the knowledge base, especially for more esoteric questions (it had no information about me, for example).

The API offers two levels of access to the application: the Direct Answer Service just takes natural-language queries and returns answers, much like True Knowledge’s own web site,  while the Query Service gives you more direct access to the knowledge base by letting you supply queries in True Knowledge’s proprietary query format. It’s quite likely that we’ll see results supplied by True Knowledge’s API inserted into other search engines’ results pages as a best first guess for question-type queries.

Would a semantic answer engine be useful for you?

  1. True Knowledge Opens API Tuesday, April 14, 2009

    [...] True Knowledge, an innovative semantic answer engine that’s currently in closed beta, opened its API today. Answer engines are different from search engines in that they provide answers to [...]

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    [...] an innovative semantic answer engine that’s currently in closed beta, has opened its API, as WebWorkerDaily reports.  "If you’re a developer, the API offers the enticing possibility of adding knowledge-based [...]

  3. Is the True Knowledge API an Answer to Natural Language Search? Tuesday, May 12, 2009

    [...] coverage of their service check Paul Miller’s report on ZDNet, Anthony Ha at VentureBeat and Simon Mackie at Web Worker Daily. Related ProgrammableWeb Resources True Knowledge [...]

  4. Is the True Knowledge API an Answer to Natural Language Search? | News Portal | Lastest News Articles Friday, May 15, 2009

    [...] True Knowledge has rivalry from another semantic wager engines providers, much as Powerset and Wolfram Alpha. However, these uncolored module wager solutions either currently demand an API, or are winking to the public, preventing their ingest in scheme applications or mashups. It module be engrossing to wager how True Knowledge’s ingest of an unstoppered API module alter into accumulated mart deal over competition products. For more beatific news of their assist analyse Paul Miller’s inform on ZDNet, Anthony Ha at VentureBeat and Simon Mackie at Web Worker Daily. [...]

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