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Summary:

Telenor Sweden and Tele2 Sweden said today they will share spectrum and build a joint Long Term Evolution 4G network in Sweden with an eye to having it up and running by the end of 2010. The timing means Sweden will get LTE around the same […]

Telenor Sweden and Tele2 Sweden said today they will share spectrum and build a joint Long Term Evolution 4G network in Sweden with an eye to having it up and running by the end of 2010. The timing means Sweden will get LTE around the same time Verizon Wireless deploys it in the U.S. and NTTDoCoMo offers it in Japan. The two Swedish carriers will be equal partners in the joint venture, which also comprises spectrum-sharing in the 900MHz and 2600MHz frequency bands.

Such network-sharing is becoming more common because the costs associated building out networks are high, and because regulations in some parts of the world are making it more difficult to locate a lot of equipment in places where people desire coverage.  Telefónica and Vodafone said last month that they would share network infrastructure in several countries; Sprint and Clearwire recently closed a deal to create a joint venture around their spectrum assets to deploy WiMAX.

Other network providers, among them France Telecom, KPN and Vodafone, are outsourcing their networks to equipment vendors. Equipment vendors typically play a large role in designing a mobile operator’s network, but letting equipment vendors run those networks is rare. As carriers consider sharing spectrum and network infrastructure, consumers and regulators will need to be on the lookout for anticompetitive behavior and try to ensure that all areas of a country are covered.

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  1. When 2G (GSM) was built we had three networks from three operators. When 3G was built some operators teamed up, one team built a complete 3G network and others teamed up for coverage outside citys. And now with 4G (LTE) we see another team, and its not the same team as with 3G. I think it could actually increase competition, as no operator will be forced out of the market due to high costs.

    1. In EU, Vivian Reding, the commissioner for information society and media pushes ahead the legislation requiring separation of infrastructure from services. If succeeded, the competition will occur in services level only. Good or bad? I don’t care as long as the end-user prices are kept as low as possible.

  2. Telenor and Tele2 agree to split LTE buildout costs in Sweden Friday, April 17, 2009

    [...] [Via GigaOM] [...]

  3. Telenor and Tele2 agree to split LTE buildout costs in Sweden | Mystery Answers Friday, April 17, 2009

    [...] a few more years for these pricey networks to get off the ground, we suppose we’ll take it. [Via GigaOM] Telenor and Tele2 agree to split LTE buildout costs in Sweden originally appeared on Engadget [...]

  4. Telenor and Tele2 agree to split LTE buildout costs in Sweden | numobile Friday, April 17, 2009

    [...] a few more years for these pricey networks to get off the ground, we suppose we’ll take it. [Via GigaOM] Telenor and Tele2 agree to split LTE buildout costs in Sweden originally appeared on Engadget [...]

  5. Telenor and Tele2 agree to split LTE buildout costs in Sweden | Cell Phones Magazine | Your daily mobile guide Friday, April 17, 2009

    [...] [Via GigaOM] [...]

  6. Telenor and Tele2 agree to split LTE buildout costs in Sweden | TeleNewsWire Friday, April 17, 2009

    [...] [Via GigaOM] [...]

  7. Reminder: You Can’t Stockpile Broadband Friday, May 15, 2009

    [...] having an entire community go silent isn’t an ideal situation. Carriers are happy to share some tower infrastructure, but generally are not sharing their radio networks, partly because they believe it acts as a [...]

  8. Reminder: You Can’t Stockpile Broadband | News Portal | Lastest News Articles Friday, May 15, 2009

    [...] having an whole accord go unhearable isn’t an saint situation. Carriers are bright to deal some shape infrastructure, but mostly are not distribution their broadcasting networks, part because they conceive it acts as [...]

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