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Summary:

Rumor on The Street has book retailer Barnes & Noble getting ready to release their own electronic e-book reader to compete with Amazon’s Kindle. B&N is supposedly one of the companies that Verizon recently admitted they were talking to about providing a 3G network for e-book […]

fictionwise-logoRumor on The Street has book retailer Barnes & Noble getting ready to release their own electronic e-book reader to compete with Amazon’s Kindle. B&N is supposedly one of the companies that Verizon recently admitted they were talking to about providing a 3G network for e-book distribution similar to the Kindle’s WhisperNet.

barnes-noble-logoThis rumor takes on a fair bit of substance when you add in B&N’s recent acquisition of Fictionwise. Fictionwise is the  online e-book retailer behind their own and the eReader brands. B&N thus has a complete eco-system for producing an electronic e-book reader and selling e-books in competition to Amazon. While Fictionwise’s e-book inventory is not as big as Amazon’s, B&N now has tens of thousands of e-books “in stock” should they launch a reader. I’d say this particular rumor has lots of legs underneath it, and I can’t wait to see an eReader device.

  1. Kevin C. Tofel Thursday, April 9, 2009

    This has me thinking back to the talk of Foxit porting eReader support to the eSlick device. B&N now owns the eReader format, but the eSlick has no wireless capability in its current iteration. Hmmm….

  2. Is it me – but the presence of the keypad on the Kindle ruins the aesthetics of the reader. Since you need an input mechanism for ordering up those books over-the-air, maybe touch screen?

  3. borax99 (Alain C.) Thursday, April 9, 2009

    Whispernet – it’s just a conspiracy designed to prevent Canadian ebook readers from accessing content !!!!!

  4. It’s funny, I actually had a conversation about this subject a few months ago. I felt like Barnes and Noble (and for that matter, Borders) were on their way out due to their inability to compete with Amazon and their selection. Their B&M stores serve to little more than impulse purchases or for those who can’t wait the shipping times. Borders especially suffers as their prices always seem higher for some reason. This is Barnes and Nobles chance to see where the Kindle made mistakes and capitalize on it. But to be honest, they aren’t a technology company, and will probably make worse mistakes than those Amazon has made.

  5. Amazon was not a technology company, too. So it’s not a big obstacle for B&N. But it is hard to compete with Kindle on local market now – advanced features, large content database, etc. Newcomer has to be really innovative, for example introduce international e-books sales network to attract European and other buyers…

  6. Barnes & Noble is going to have to make some big changes to ereader.com for it to survive. Kindle on the iPhone means much better pricing on e-books. I’ve compared some prices and found as much as a 50% savings on some titles at Amazon. I do like the ereader iPhone app; though I’m sure the Kindle app will improve.

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