Summary:

Intel released its proxy today, and in it was some blatant self-promotion that caught my eye. The chipmaker said that by making its proxy materials available online for the past two years, it’s saved some $4.5 million in printing and postage costs and avoided generating the […]

Intel released its proxy today, and in it was some blatant self-promotion that caught my eye. The chipmaker said that by making its proxy materials available online for the past two years, it’s saved some $4.5 million in printing and postage costs and avoided generating the equivalent of 8 million pounds of carbon dioxide and more than 26 million gallons of wastewater.

Reducing the expenses incurred when dealing with paper are one of the main reasons I’m such a big believer in broadband access for all. But there’s still an environmental cost associated with hosting the proxy in storage, and energy is needed to run the servers a user pings when she wants to download the proxy on her power-sucking PC. However, for Intel’s shareholders, the cost savings on postage — as well as the likelihood that many of the computers involved in accessing and keeping the proxy online contain Intel’s chips — do make this something to crow about. Especially given that the proxy revisits some grim news, such as the drop in net income year-over-year and a $938 million write off of Intel’s Clearwire investment.

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