22 Comments

Summary:

When it comes to gaming, the most popular platform isn’t the Nintendo Wii, but Flash, the interactive browser plugin that now boasts 99 percent market penetration on nearly a billion PCs. (Flash game advertising network Mochi Media currently counts 100 million players across its system alone.) […]

pbe_logoWhen it comes to gaming, the most popular platform isn’t the Nintendo Wii, but Flash, the interactive browser plugin that now boasts 99 percent market penetration on nearly a billion PCs. (Flash game advertising network Mochi Media currently counts 100 million players across its system alone.) That huge audience has led to a lot of games, but most of them are rudimentary at best, the product of amateur enthusiasts working with limited resources. That’s why I was excited to hear about PushButton, a Flash game engine from a team of seasoned game developers that’s free, open source, and associated with an innovative revenue model that should help spur its adoption.

Quietly released in open beta to friends and family last week, it already seems to be gaining an enthusiastic following; Ada Chen of Mochi told me she’s also heard a lot about it from developers at Sunday’s Flash Gaming Summit, and “the feedback has all been overwhelmingly positive.” It comes from Push Button Labs, a new startup led by Jeff Tunnell, founder of Dynamix and co-founder of GarageGames. (The latter company was acquired by IAC to become InstantAction, the web-based 3D gaming platform we wrote about last month.)

Tunnell and his team briefed me on PushButton at this week’s Game Developers Conference, including explaining their business model: Since the engine is free (and distributed under the extremely liberal MIT license), the company will instead make money by selling premium components and assets that PushButton users can buy to improve their games. Developers can also sell components they made on PushButton’s open market — sort of an App Store for Flash game makers — with the company collecting a 30 percent cut on each sale. Sounds like a smart way to leverage and empower a growing community of Flash developers and other startups interested in making a living from casual games. For consumers, that should also translate into better games coming to their browsers soon.

  1. [...] original here: Open-source Flash Game Engine Now In Open Beta This entry was posted on Saturday, March 28th, 2009 at 8:00 am and is filed under News, [...]

    Share
  2. [...] Go here to feature the rest:  Open-source Flash Game Engine Now In Open Beta [...]

    Share
  3. I ended my gamedev “career” in 1990. I developed “doors” — basically single player text based online games for BBSes. Those were good days.

    I came across Mochi yesterday for the first time ever. I’ve never played an online game, surprisingly, but have ideas for decent gameplay. I was thinking about the steep time investment to learn Flash game coding not 8 hours ago.

    Thanks to GO and PushButton I can now waste profitable hours of my life hacking away at vectors, if-then statements, and debugging scripts.

    Lovely.

    Share
  4. My impression was the same as A.B. above…doesn’t look much simpler than just learning Flash straight up…it just focuses your steep learning curve in a different direction.

    Share
  5. Flash game coding is ludicrously easy compared to almost any other game development toolset. PopCap for instance does all their games in C/C++, which is a much more complicated scenario. Mobile games require complex Java or C coding to be competitive.

    There are a million good books and tutorials on Flash game dev, and you can get a basic game up and running in just a few lines of ActionScript. Honestly, if you view Flash/AS3 as having a steep learning curve, you may not want to be in the business of programming games. :)

    Share
  6. [...] Open-source Flash Game Engine Now In Open Beta (tags: flash gamedev library) [...]

    Share
  7. This sounds interesting. Ben is right about Flash being relatively easy to learn. but if something like this can help people make better flash games then I am all for it.

    Share
  8. [...] Read More Tags: Adoption, Flash Game, Free Open Source, Game Developers, Game Engine, Open Beta, Revenue Model, Source Flash ← Open-Source R600 OpenGL Support May Come Soon – Tectonic [...]

    Share
  9. Perhaps i’ll take another look…I may have misjudged the difficulty of Flash.

    Share
  10. [...] gigaom Billets similaires:Créer son propre univers virtuel en 3D iso en flashMoteur 3D isométrique pour [...]

    Share

Comments have been disabled for this post