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Summary:

China implemented a site-wide block of YouTube today, for reasons still unknown. The country has blocked portions of YouTube before as part of its censorship programs, but blocking the entire site is something new.

China implemented a site-wide block of YouTube today, for reasons still unknown. The country has blocked portions of YouTube before as part of its censorship programs, but blocking the entire site is something new.

Wired’s Epicenter blog lists some recent events that could have triggered China’s censorship officials’ massive blockade, including footage of Chinese soldiers beating Tibetans, or videos released by the U.S. Navy of Chinese ships attempting to interfere with a sonar array cable being dragged behind the USNS Impeccable.

Regardless, Chinese citizens currently can’t watch videos on YouTube, and while parent company Google is working to restore access, it doesn’t know what its next steps will be.

The Chinese government exerts strict control over content and has denied the required licenses to different Chinese video-sharing sites in the past. During a recent visit to our offices, Youku CEO Victor Koo said that officials in charge of censoring content had been more permissive as of late.

Last year, all of YouTube went down after technical error occurred when Pakistan attempted to block access to a particular video clip to the site.

  1. [...] suspects.” This particular wording follows recent actions by the Chinese government to block access to YouTube after a video was uploaded supposedly showing police brutality in [...]

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  2. [...] no official from the country has yet contacted the company. Then again, the Chinese government has been blocking YouTube since March, he noted, and no official from the People’s Republic has notified the service, either. [...]

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  3. [...] the Internet, which could explain why it didn’t try to block YouTube over the video, like China and Pakistan have done before. The OpenNet Initiative reported in 2007 that Azerbaijan to that [...]

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  4. [...] online video industry in China is still fairly wide open, in part due to the government’s aggressive stance against global online video leader YouTube. But Youku seems to be in a good position to capture a [...]

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  5. [...] from watching videos on the Google-owned site. Thailand, Turkey, Brazil, and most recently, China have all acted to cut off access to YouTube over the past several [...]

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  6. [...] to web censorship, as it has been blocked in a number of countries. Thailand, Turkey, Brazil, China and most recently, Pakistan, have all acted to cut off access to YouTube over the past several [...]

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