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Oil Demand Set to Drop: Today the International Energy Agency lowered its estimate for 2009 global oil demand, saying demand will drop for two years in a row for the first time since 1982-1983. — Associated Press Feed-in Tariff Pitfalls: Feed-in tariffs have enabled Germany and […]

Oil Demand Set to Drop: Today the International Energy Agency lowered its estimate for 2009 global oil demand, saying demand will drop for two years in a row for the first time since 1982-1983. — Associated Press

Feed-in Tariff Pitfalls: Feed-in tariffs have enabled Germany and Spain to leap ahead of other countries in solar installations and stimulate rapid wind power development — but feed-in tariffs elsewhere in the EU have fizzled. — NYT’s Green Inc.

Let the Lobbying Begin: The wind and solar industries are gaining a powerful voice in Washington as coal companies, utilities, economists and environmentalists jockey to shape climate legislation that could rechannel hundreds of billions of dollars from one part of the economy to others. — Washington Post

Fork in the Road to Next Gen Biofuels: Most researchers agree that it’s time to dump corn-based ethanol, but they have two different visions for where to go from here: Fast-growing non-food crops like switchgrass, or algae and engineered microorganisms? — Scientific American

Do Green Jobs Pay Well?: A new study finds green job wages vary, and recommends 10 ways to make sure the new green jobs are good jobs. First up: Attach living-wage requirements to subsidies. — Triple Pundit

  1. [...] Finding a silver lining in the gigantic economic mess that is gripping the world right now is pretty hard to do, but if you were to look for a silver lining, experts are predicting a major drop in oil demand and global emissions. Ideally, the drop in emissions would come as a result of people making responsible choices, not the expansion of poverty — but the word on the street is that oil demand will drop 1.5 percent this year from 2008 levels, which were already down .4 percent from 2007 levels. If the experts are right — and it looks like they will be — this will be the first time that global demand for oil has dropped in two consecutive years since 1982-1983. To put that into some kind of concrete yet still unimaginably large and therefore abstract terms, the IEA estimates that the world will consume 270,000 fewer barrels of oil every day. On a related not, a professor at Cambridge University is predicting a 40-50% drop in greenhouse gas emissions due to the global economic downturn. So, that’s kinda like a platinum lining for you. [via Earth2Tech] [...]

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