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Summary:

I know I’m a geek and that gadget lust is a natural part of my life.  New gadgets still have to tweak that gadget desire into overdrive to get me going though, I don’t just hand that out for free.  Palm first got me going at […]

palm-pre1I know I’m a geek and that gadget lust is a natural part of my life.  New gadgets still have to tweak that gadget desire into overdrive to get me going though, I don’t just hand that out for free.  Palm first got me going at the Pre press event in Las Vegas in January.  The press event made it clear that the Pre is going to be special, especially to a geek like me.

The hands-on (almost) demonstration we got after that event really got my gadget juices flowing.  The Pre operating environment is so different from everything else out there that it is a natural for me to want it.  There are so many gadgets out there, and when one comes along that is radically different then my want notches up a fair bit.

Every video demonstration I have seen of the Pre since that first date has ratcheted up the want factor higher and higher.  Watching that fluid UI waltz around the user information is heady indeed.  Palm has got my attention and I want the Pre, and I want it now.  I know that the “first half of 2009″ means the window is short but that’s too long when you’re smitten as I am.  I need it now, Palm, so let’s get this Pre out in the world.  Please?  Pretty please?

  1. Agreed entirely, the sooner the better, so that I can switch to it. And no more useless webcasts like the one today (though that browser speed thing was interesting info).

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  2. With all this pre-hype the price will be huge. And lets face it the first wave will all be beta testers

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    1. I don’t see it being over $250 subsidized myself. And you could have said the beta testers thing about the iPhone too, but like the iPhone, there will be much simpler and quicker firmware updates (I believe they mentioned OTA updates in fact).

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    2. They won’t sell for more than $200.

      Pre owners will be much more beta testers than early iphone adopters for a couple of simple reasons.

      Palm is cash poor and has been shedding employees leading up to launch, as opposed to Apple which beefed its iphone division up steadily.

      So Palm will proabaly have more bugs have slower firmware updates.

      Palm has a culture of releasing with lots of bugs and being much slower at fixing them than most.

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  3. I’ll get one if it comes to AT&T…

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    1. The thing about cellphone providers is that it depends on location. However, I’ve had so much better reception and faster internet over the years I’ve had Sprint than my friends with AT&T (who get dropped calls all the time). Combine that with Sprint’s plans being much cheaper, and I have absolutely no problem sticking with them.

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  4. I’m a long time Symbian/Nokia user and right now I’m torn between the Pre, the 5800 XPressMusic, and the N97. For the life of me, I can’t tell the substantive differences between the latter two save for hardware qwerty and 32GB memory. I presently own an N95 and can wait, but I sure don’t like it!

    Patrick

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  5. Sprint is not as cheaper as claimed. Everyone has mobile phones now so everyone “mobile to mobile” free calls within companies. Verizon has 85 million customers. ATT has almost 80 million. Sprint has 40 million and falling.

    I switched to a $70 sprint plan and found myself using way more billable minutes than my Verizon.

    Fortunately Sprint has a ETF waiver period so I got out (Sprint has more hidden costs like that), but Sprint also has bigger ripoff ETF than most carriers which is also a cost.

    Sprint has a poor reputation for a reason – it is based in fact. It is only going to get worse with tower growth and upkeep sure to suffer with their falling revenue.

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    1. Sprint: 450 minutes, nights and weekends starting at 7pm, unlimited data, unlimited GPS, unlimited text messaging: $70

      Verizon: 450 minutes, nights and weekends at 9pm, unlimited data,unlimited text messaging: $99 (and I believe GPS is an extra $10 but I didn’t see it on the site).

      AT&T: 450 minutes, nights and weekends at 9pm, unlimited data, unlimited texts, unlimited GPS: $80 ($9 extra for nights and weekends starting at 7pm).

      I don’t know about you, but I’d rather pay $70 for all of those features and have unlimited nights and weekends starting at 7pm for an extra 2 hours every day than having to worry about only calling people on my network.

      And Sprint’s poor reputation is based on fact, but pretty much nothing to do with coverage or internet speeds or anything, and everything to do with customer service. I’ll definitely admit, over the years their customer service hasn’t been good, but it’s made huge strides in the past year and a half.

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    2. I have tried to find matching plans on Verizon and AT&T the last two times I renewed with Sprint. I bring in my Sprint bill and after reviewing with a their sales rep we can never get close to my Sprint costs. It’s not even a “I got everything for free ’cause I bugged the crap out of customer service” thing. Just a family plan with four lines. Since Sprint coverage has been good for me and customer service has been mostly good its been a winner overall :) bring on the Pre!

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    3. I have the 450 simplyeverything plan and only use $200 of those mins since most of my friends are Sprint/Nextel users. I’m also a geek girl I buy a new phone every three months until rumors of the Pre surfaced. I’m using the Centro (love it) & now that I have premiere status I’m eligible for an upgrade in June so I can’t wait for this phone to come out bugs and all.

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  6. Palm has so badly disappointed over the last 5 (7?) years, that I’m more then a little gun shy in getting sucked up in the hype. I hope it’s great, since I love the idea of adding to the competition for my mobile dollars – it makes everyone try harder. But, boy oh boy, Palm has a big mountain to climb before I am ready to fall for anything of their’s blindly.

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  7. OK James, so it does HTML and Javascript really well. But as the iPhone showed when Apple tried that “Web only” development shuck and jive: you can’t write Super Monkey Ball in HTML/Javascript.

    So they’ve got alot of HTML/Javascript widget sizzle but what is their plan to deliver the actual steak?

    I seriously doubt Tom Tom is going to deliver a real GPS solution for the Pre in HTML/Javascript. Not that Sprint will mind. :-)

    Just a short list drawn from my iPhone 3G’s daily load out:
    Epocrates
    eReader
    Kindle
    Evernote
    Fstream
    Heart Monitor
    NY Times Reader
    Ocarina
    Omnifocus
    Payback
    Pano
    Seadragon
    Tags
    Spore
    Tap Tap Revenge
    X-Plane

    I’m not trying to rain on the parade but Real Apps need Real Dev Tools that generate Real Binary Code from a development language that can handle more than a few thousand lines of source code.

    I was at the WWDC where they tried to pitch Javascript as a replacement for Objective-C. No one was marching up to the stage to pick up their cups of Kool Aid. We weren’t quite jeering but there was alot of whispering in the audience about Steve’s Reality Distortion Field having gone into overload/burn out.

    Apps like X-Plane, Tags, Seadragon, Heart Monitor, Ocarina require access to hand rolled SIMD code to do some heavy number crunching. Real time or near real time computation of FFT’s isn’t something Javascript lists as a speciality. And certainly doesn’t allow hand tuning the instruction stream to get every last oink out of the CPU to give the maximum 3D rendering speed for real time games.

    DRM used in NY Times Rader, eReader, Kindle like the comfortable obscurity of binary code. Not to mention the ability to crunch streams of bits rather than bytes to implement said DRM decryption.

    Next time someone gets in range of a live microphone could you please ask Palm what the follow up strategy is for Real Applications?

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    1. You really think they’re going to answer that? They’ll say exactly what their response about games was “We’re not going to comment on 3D gaming right now”.

      And for the record, since Palm is providing things like GPS in it’s APIs, it is fully possible for TomTom to write an application just like Telenav did. Whether they will is something entirely different (and since you get unlimited GPS included with the plan, I don’t see there being a big market for that anyway).

      I really that no native apps isn’t perfect, but I think a lot of people will be surprised at what is possible with Palm’s locally stored JS/CSS/HTML5 applications. We’ll have to see at release of the SDK for that.

      And I personally do expect that like the iPhone, later in the Pre’s life, there will be a deeper SDK released, but for now, the HTML application base is a much better solution than it was for the iPhone just because of how Palm implemented it. That’s still one of my top 3 flaws with it, but not one that will prevent me from getting it.

      (And if you’re wondering, since I have a lot of comments here already responding to the negatives of the Pre and how they’re not as bad as people are making them out to be, I’ll give you my other two negatives: 8GB isn’t as much storage as I’d prefer, and the big unknown is the battery life, which I have a feeling will disappoint me from the enormous extended battery currently on my Sprint Moto q9c.)

      I don’t want to sound too obsessed here though, so I might have to let others respond to some of the comments. ;)

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    2. Just because there are GPS API’s doesn’t mean Tom Tom can write a full up turn by turn navigator in HTML/Javascript. There’s a teeny bit more to it than just discovering the latitude and longitude. Like route calculation/re-calculation and live traffic data.

      I’ve tried the various iPhone 3G navigation options and personally prefer a native mode app with all the trimmings on my iPhone 3G (G-Map). The big issue for me is having the maps onboard the phone. When you have a turn coming up at 65 MPH that’s the wrong time for at&t’s network to hiccup and interrupt your map access.

      I’ve very aware of the HTML 5 improvements (I sit on the committee) so the short list I put up is based on what I thought could be done with a state-of-the-art webkit.

      You aren’t doing Seadragon with CSS and Javascript nor do I think you’ll see Microsoft whipping up Tags quickly either. And how does HTML 5 help you do the Fast Fourier Transforms required to do the time domain sampling for HeartMonitor to detect and measure your heart rate?

      Yes, HeartMonitor is a toy for some but when you’ve got six steents its a bit more than a toy. But the above list is just part of what I carry around. Others I work with have other collections of native mode apps that I think will hold them to iPhone 3G if Palm can’t answer them on its new flagship platform.

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  8. James: you sound like an Apple fanboy ;) Are we going to see a new breed of Pre fanboys now ;)

    I want one too btw …

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    1. For me it’s all about the gadget. The platform or other factors don’t matter one whit to me. If the gadget will do what I need and happens to be cool too that’s just icing on the cake. I am a geek.

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  9. As a single person shop running on GoogleApps and a Sprint Mogul (not quite 2 years old) WinMobile 6.1 phone. I just want an option that doesn’t need to be rebooted regularly, with good battery life and the buttons work. I have thought about the BlackBerry but since I owned the original Palm Pilot and have owned a Treo. I am hoping the Pre will be the answer.

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  10. I want to believe in Pre…I really do. But I won’t be jumping on board until I see a couple of solid reviews. Its too big a departure from the mobile phone norm for me to take it on faith.

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