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On Monday, the NYTimes.com will announce plans for hyperlocal sites throughout New York and New Jersey. The new online channel is called The…

On Monday, the NYTimes.com will announce plans for hyperlocal sites throughout New York and New Jersey. The new online channel is called The Local and will blend citizen journalism and staff reports, according to a draft of a release obtained by paidContent. The first sites in the program will focus on Clinton Hill and Fort Greene in Brooklyn, N.Y., and Maplewood, Millburn and South Orange, N.J. The site will cover all the usual neighborhood points of interest — schools, restaurants, businesses and real estate, as well as crime, government services, transportation, events — and will hope to attract local advertisers. The effort follows several other online initiatives the NYTimes.com has taken, including featuring aggregated news on its home page and the wave of new blog sections the past few months.

Interestingly, The Local will also be enlisting students taught by Buzzmachine’s Jeff Jarvis as part of his citizen journalism initiative at The City University of New York. Jarvis told me that the collaboration came out of a discussion with NYT’s Jon Landman at an Online Publishers Association meeting about two months ago. “The NYT is trying to figure out hyperlocal journalism and this is an important step,” Jarvis told me. In addition to helping the NYTimes.com, Jarvis’ program is seeking a foundation grant to teach people in neighborhoods how to be trained as community journalists. A half dozen of his students will work on The Local and will also serve as interns during the summer on the initiative.

Jarvis added that the new initiative will reach out to a new population of advertisers — the plumbers and pizza places that don’t tend to market themselves in the pages of the NYT. Much has been made of the fact that many newspapers have neglected to target smaller businesses and have lost out to online directories. To help the NYT catch up, Jarvis hopes to bring in business students from Baruch College to help map out the best ways to bring in those new advertisers.

NYTimes.com rolls out new energy section: As part of its rollout of business blogs, the NYTimes.com is also expanding its green coverage. Today, the site introduced its new Energy & Environment section. The section promises a great deal of online-only material and original videos, as well as aggregates news and headlines from Environment & Energy Publishing

  1. Well, hyperlocal is the last mile and only defensible position that they have left. Now, if they allow personalization and become the "Local Information and Connection Utility" that Newspaper Next implores them to become. At kayanta.com, we are experimenting with applications with the intent to consumers, publishers, and advertisers within a locale to connect in novel ways. I could be convinced to pay for such a service if the perceived value and usefulness is high enough.

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  2. Seems like a good way for them to get local– they should enlist the community members to provide familiar voices, engage high school newspapers for sports reporting & scores and allow local people to derive a commission from selling local ads/classified ads as well (rather than have it be phone based or self-serve online which is scary to many small busineses.)

    There are quite a few companies doing this– hopefully the NYTimes won't stand in its own way.

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  3. nice to see the NY Times values blogging, but work FOR FREE for them. in the age of blogging, why not set up your own local blog instead of offering NYT free content? don't they know the areas they're covering??? get new blog help at BlogToGreat[dot]com .

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  4. its great that NY times actually value what the bloggers think

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  5. gretchengrant Monday, March 2, 2009

    It's a sad day when the future of the New York Times depends on high school journalists and unpaid journalism school interns.

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  6. enricodesimone Thursday, June 4, 2009

    Reporter fotografici dilettanti: giornalismo visivo!

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