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Summary:

Comcast said this morning it plans to roll out its super-fast DOCSIS 3.0 network to 65 percent of its footprint by the end of 2009, and upgrade subscribers in those markets to a minimum speed of 12 Mbps down and 2 Mbps up at no charge […]

Comcast said this morning it plans to roll out its super-fast DOCSIS 3.0 network to 65 percent of its footprint by the end of 2009, and upgrade subscribers in those markets to a minimum speed of 12 Mbps down and 2 Mbps up at no charge wherever possible. Those subscribing to higher tiers will be upgraded to the Comcast’s Blast tier, which will offer download speeds to up to 16 Mbps and provide up to 2 Mbps of upload speed.

New tiers offered with the fatter pipes will include 50 Mbps of downstream speed and up to 10 Mbps of upstream speed for $139.95 a month, as well as 22 Mbps of downstream speed and up to 5 Mbps of upstream speed for $62.95 a month. Higher speeds will certainly help Comcast keep up with Verizon’s  FiOS deployments and will make downloading video a lot faster.

On its earnings call yesterday, Comcast CFO Mike Angelakis said the nation’s largest cable company expects to invest between $400 million and $500 million of capital for the DOCSIS 3.0 deployment and all-digital projects. He declined to break down the details of that spending, however. Comcast had upgraded 20 percent of its footprint to DOCSIS 3.0 at the end of 2008, and said on the call yesterday that it has installed DOCSIS 3.0 in 30 percent of its market.

  1. WOO-HOO! Now we can hit that 250gb limit even sooner!

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  2. Faster to the allocated cap, is crap.

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  3. GigaOM: I would really like to read a piece on how the broadband infrastructure is build in different countries. Being able to charge prices like Comcast would make broadband providers in some countries insanly rich. And in others I guess it would create a loss. If we put poor countries aside, how come the cost of providing broadband is so different?

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  4. Anyone know if there’s a map that shows where the roll out has occured and where it will occur by year’s end?

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  5. Previous commenters are right (and faster than me). Nice bandwidth / tolerable pricepoint, but just amplifies the bandwidth cap issue.

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  6. Can someone share their insights on what wider deployment of DOCSIS 3.0 should/could mean for cable’s long expected assault on the small business voice services market? With telcos all but conceding that DSL can’t compete with cable’s fatter pipe what will happen in the business market?

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  7. Stacey Higginbotham Thursday, February 19, 2009

    Yes, it is faster to the cap, but remember that if the average usage gets close to the cap then comcast will rethink it. So get your HD downloads ready. http://gigaom.com/2008/09/24/two-ways-to-get-comcast-to-ditch-the-data-cap/

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  8. Does DOCSIS offer any advantages in terms of reliability/uptime? I’m happy with the speeds I get from Comcast right now but the connection goes down once a week here in seattle. A nuisance to say the least.

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  9. @John

    No. Reliability varies from market to market anyway, as much of Comcast’s network was built from a conglomeration of small regional operators. There is no standardization for the central offices. Things are even worse in metro-areas, which are cobbled together from what used to many geographically smaller markets. Moving 10mi can put you on a different CO with different reliability and even different network performance (uplink throughput limits seem to range quite widely). There is little chance that cable cos will do any sort of major overhaul that brings uniformity to the national network any time soon. Maybe when FiOS is available to over 50% of the country . . .

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  10. I thought cable provider plants did not use the CO model, but a digital carrier over RF that mimics a metropolitan Ethernet WAN. In these cases, distance is less of an issue, or a non-issue, unlike DSL of TP.

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