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Summary:

Last week, I passed along a small-screen browsing tip for netbooks and sub-notebooks. You can use mobile-friendly websites instead of desktop versions and usually get more info on smaller displays. Today, OStatic tips me off to another one: it’s an oldie but a goodie. OStatic recommends […]

littlefox

Last week, I passed along a small-screen browsing tip for netbooks and sub-notebooks. You can use mobile-friendly websites instead of desktop versions and usually get more info on smaller displays. Today, OStatic tips me off to another one: it’s an oldie but a goodie.

OStatic recommends using the Littlefox extension for Firefox and I can see why. Littlefox is more of a custom theme than anything else, but it helps get a wee bit more content on your display. It’s especially useful if you want to keep multiple toolbars on your screen since it uses littler, er smaller custom icons and toolbar sizes.

While you could always hit F11 and go full-screen in Firefox, Littlefox crams more in the regular view. Not sure if Littlefox is for you? Check out this video over at Linux Journal to get a feel for the free extension.

  1. I don’t personally like that theme myself, I’m using MidnightFox, but you should add the “Hide Menubar” extension to this post if you’re looking to use space and use that as rarely as I do. You can still call it up by pressing the alt key, but it gives you a lot more room to work with than this seems to. And then if you don’t use the bookmark bar or the status bar, that saves a lot more space too.

  2. And just as an example, here’s how much more minimal the interface looks for me.

    I actually use the bookmark bar because I’m on a tablet so it’s helpful when it’s folded into tablet mode, but here’s my Firefox without multiple tabs open:
    http://img9.imageshack.us/img9/3020/firefoxck0.jpg

    And with multiple tabs open:
    http://img6.imageshack.us/img6/4231/firefox2tr8.jpg

  3. When in Customize Toolbar the bookmarks toolbar may be moved to the same row as the menu bar. Then right click on space where bookmarks used to be and uncheck Bookmarks Toolbar. This clears up even more space.

  4. It does seem to jam a lot in a little space but I would take a look at MicroFox. I find it aesthetically a bit better done.

  5. I personally find Tiny Menu extension more efficient. It render the menu as a simple button so you can get the menu bar and navigation bar into one.

  6. Auto-hiding the Windows Taskbar will also reclaim a lot of space and works a lot better than going fullscreen in Firefox.

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