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Summary:

After success with its low-power Atom processor in netbooks, Intel is embracing the mobile Internet device, with the chip giant expected to announce at this year’s Mobile World Congress a planned MID with LG Electronics that will include 3G voice capabilities. The MID will run on […]

After success with its low-power Atom processor in netbooks, Intel is embracing the mobile Internet device, with the chip giant expected to announce at this year’s Mobile World Congress a planned MID with LG Electronics that will include 3G voice capabilities. The MID will run on Intel’s Moorestown chipsets, and debut next year. Also at the show, Intel is announcing a partnership with wireless handset design firm Elektrobit, to offer a generic MID platform that will include some type of Atom chip — although not necessarily voice.

Intel’s focus on MIDs is a bit odd given the potential it has to cannibalize netbook sales, not to mention evidence of the chipmaker’s ambivalence toward the form factor. However, an Intel/LG MID would be a huge step for Intel because it takes its Atom processor beyond tiny computers (i.e. netbooks) and puts it into what is essentially a large phone (although details of the actual form factor are sketchy). The phone has long been territory owned by ARM, whose IP cores are the basis of many of the smartphones out there today. Intel’s push into MIDs also means more competition for the many vendors, including Qualcomm, that offer integrated processors and radios for phones today and have designs on the MID market as well.

However, targeting the MID market isn’t a guaranteed success, since it’s not really defined, and it depends on carriers offering compelling data plans to really make an MID worth toting around in addition to a smartphone and as a replacement for a laptop. But that’s not stopping Intel from pushing cheap, portable computing. But cheap hardware, without cheaper data plans, are not going to convince consumers to turn in their smartphones and trade up to an MID.

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  1. Francis Simisim Sunday, February 15, 2009

    Interesting… technology will just become cheaper and cheaper and more powerful in the near future. Can’t wait for the product of this partnership.

  2. Technology is making the lives much simpler…we can image through the different stages..Computer of a room size, desktop, laptop, now Mobile……can things be even smaller than this in the near future…? got to wait and see

  3. Intel is pretty desperate. Starting this year, ARM vendors are going to eat Intel’s lunch not only in terms of being 10x better than Intel MIDs for compact devices, but especially for providing cheaper laptops running perfectly usable Ubuntu or Android Linux distributions and having much longer battery lives and weighting less. Also, especially, ARM laptops are not going to have any of the Intel/Microsoft imposed limitations on netbooks such as screen size, storage, ram, HD digital outputs to HDTVs, video inputs, disc drives and more.

    ARM is about to eat Intel for lunch.

  4. Pronostic Fotbal Monday, February 16, 2009

    I seems that Motorola is loosing. Maybe that is why Macintosh company does not use Motorola chips anymore.

  5. OM – I find your spin on this interesting. Intel created the MID concept to combat the UMPC (and VIA). There have been a lot of announcements of MID devices, but almost everything is still “Next Year”. ARM and ATOM are getting close to equivalent computing power. ARM still has the lead on power consumption. Intel still has the computing power edge. What is new is the inclusion of voice on the MID platform. If Microsoft ever ports Windows to ARM then Intel will be in big trouble at the low end. But that would seriously damage Windows Mobile.

  6. Sorry, Stacey – missed that that was your post, not Om’s.

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