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Summary:

When the Sony Vaio P started shipping to customers it became clear that the U.S. version of the little notebook wasn’t using its technology fully.  Sony has put the Gobi technology into the Vaio P, which makes it theoretically capable of working with just about every […]

tnkgrl-modWhen the Sony Vaio P started shipping to customers it became clear that the U.S. version of the little notebook wasn’t using its technology fully.  Sony has put the Gobi technology into the Vaio P, which makes it theoretically capable of working with just about every 3G network in existence but they have only enabled the CDMA stuff to work with Verizon.

Not one to accept limitations in her mobile gear, tnkgrl (who I was happy to meet recently) took her shiny new Vaio P and opened it up to both a soldering iron and a hacker’s toolkit.  The end result is a new Vaio P with HSDPA support that she can use on her network of choice.  She has detailed the process for those who also have the guts to try this.  This scares me but less wimpy geeks may be willing to give it a try.

  1. Sony just lost how many billions last quarter? In my youth I would have bought the Vaio P and hacked it myself but now I sit around plotting how to get a European model. If Sony had left in the SIM slot I’d own one already. The tighter they grasp their hands the more sales slip through their fingers.,, I’ll just keep lugging around my hacked Motion LE1700 with hacked in AT&T.

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  2. Does anyone know someone who’s good enough with a soldering iron to add an extra MiniPCI-E slot to my Toshiba laptop without bricking it in the NYC area? I know this isn’t exactly on topic, but it’s still pretty relevant; I’m trying to add an internal 3G modem from mobilx.eu…better than the minimalistic stick-out Option card I have right now; the antenna keeps breaking in my bag.

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