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The Korea Communications Commission is working on plans that will boost broadband speeds in that country tenfold by the end of 2012. That means Koreans will access 1 Gbps service by 2012. That’s 200 times as fast as your typical 5 Mbps DSL connection sold in […]

The Korea Communications Commission is working on plans that will boost broadband speeds in that country tenfold by the end of 2012. That means Koreans will access 1 Gbps service by 2012. That’s 200 times as fast as your typical 5 Mbps DSL connection sold in the U.S. At present, Koreans can get speeds of up to 100 Mbps from their broadband providers. Availability of such high-speed connections has allowed Korea to emerge as a leader in the MMO and online gaming industries. Even higher broadband speeds are going to unveil many new usage scenarios, which can lead to new company creation.

In addition to its wired broadband efforts, KCC expects wireless broadband to get a 10x speed bump to 10 Mbps vs. current speeds. KCC is promoting the homegrown WiBro standard as a way to boost speeds. It will re-allocate spectrum in the 800 MHz and 900 MHz bands with preference given to new operators and latecomers to the market. KCC wants to allocate the spectrum next year and hopes that services start in June 2011. IPTV is another area of focus for KCC.

The efforts are part of giving Korean IT infrastructure a boost, according to KCC. The plan is going to cost about $24.6 billion and will create 120,000 jobs. KCC was established because of the convergence of telecom, broadcast and broadband industries.We need our FCC to start thinking along those lines and make some drastic changes to get us to an ultrabroadband future . (Image Courtesy of JoongAng Daily.)

  1. Agree 100%. Current proposals are so lame and short-sighted. They miss the point and the opportunity to do something right. Korea and Japan are good examples of govt. and industry partnership to boost nation’s economy.

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  2. [...] Om Malik over at GigaOM has a report on the newest move by Korea’s Communication Commission is planning on a countrywide broadband upgrade. The country already has one of the best broadband penetration and speed in the world and they plan that by 2012 it will be getting a whole lot better. How much better you ask – well try a 10 fold increase in speed. [...]

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  3. It is very sad to see USA lagging behind the likes of Korea and Japan in broadband speeds. lets wait and see what the new administration will offer in this area.

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  4. Why is Korea so lucky? Here I am reading Korea will get 1gbps by 2012… and then I’m reading North American internet will be filtered by the government by 2012. This is crazy.

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  5. [...] It another I told you so for Third Pipe. I have stated mroe than once that the wodl standard for broadband would be moving to Gigabit in the coming months. South Korea has chimed in with plans to make it a reality by 2012.  If you beleive the press, the obejtives here are to get to 50 MBPS and extent the reach of broadband to the rural and poor. A noble cause, but how will we pay fro it if our competitiveness is further hampered by substandard pipes? The Korea Communications Commission is working on plans that will boost broadband speeds in that country by ten times by the end of 2012. That means Koreans will access of 1 Gbps service by 2012. That’s 200 times as fast as your typical 5 Mbps DSL connection sold in the US. At present, Koreans can get speeds of upto 100 Mbps from their broadband providers. Availability of such high-speed connections has allowed Korea to emerge as a leader in the MMO and online gaming industries. Even higher broadband speeds are going to unveil many new usage-scenarios, which can lead to new company creation. (Gigaom) [...]

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  6. I’m sure I’ll still have 1.5/384 in 2012. Yeah America!

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  7. Oh man they’re gonna PWN us without mercy as soon as we enter any Starcraft/Ragnarok server…

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  8. South Korea continues to lead the world in this dept. Although the US has a topology that would make a similar roll out here several orders of magnitude more complex, it is completely baffling why even our major cities are incapable of having highly reliable ultra-fast broadband. Of course, I’m a bit prejudiced when it comes to this sort of stuff. If it were up to me, I’d bump that stimulus package up to a cool 2 Trillion with half of it going to broadband and advanced communication technologies :-)

    On a serious note, though… selling internet access is not exactly a winning proposition. It’s a commodity people don’t expect to pay a lot of money for, yet the demand for faster access continues to increase. This is definitely a reason why the government should play a greater role. The private sector simply doesn’t have the incentive to invest in cutting-edge technology.

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  9. That’s not really a big deal anymore, in Hong Kong 1Gbps has been around for years for instance.

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  10. You can write to FCC at :
    http://www.fcc.gov/contacts.html
    I wrote to them, my post is at :
    http://people20.blogspot.com

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