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Summary:

The Huffington Post has acquired IAC’s stake in 236.com, the comedy blog and video site it had co-launched with IAC in November 2007, according to a memo issued today. 23/6, which wasn’t much of a brand on its own, will now become HuffPo’s comedy section. What […]

The Huffington Post has acquired IAC’s stake in 236.com, the comedy blog and video site it had co-launched with IAC in November 2007, according to a memo issued today.

23/6, which wasn’t much of a brand on its own, will now become HuffPo’s comedy section. What with IAC reorganizing itself, it was widely known that 23/6 could be shut down or sold. Meanwhile, HuffPo is working to build other topics besides politics, now that the election is over. The site also has cash to burn; it recently raised $25 million in new funding.

Get the latest news satire and funny videos at 236.com.

We weren’t fans of 23/6 at launch, but we loved its video incarnation of Get Your War On, and the show won top prize at one of our community-judged Pier Screenings last summer. The site had also teamed up with Funny or Die for a joint project last year.

It must have been a daunting task for the last year or so to run a comedy site for 23/6’s two somewhat humorless masters. As 23/6 says on its soon-to-be-updated masthead,

236.com is a co-production between the gigantic, vaguely Death Star-like IAC, and The Huffington Post, a progressive news hub where outraged people go in order to get more outraged before going to have dinner at Nobu.

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