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Summary:

We last briefly looked at Invotrak in the Summer of 2007. The service is similar to Freshbooks, in that users can create and track invoices and timesheets for client projects and employees as well as some funky analysis of payment history. Feature-for-feature, Invotrak and Freshbooks seem […]

invotrakWe last briefly looked at Invotrak in the Summer of 2007. The service is similar to Freshbooks, in that users can create and track invoices and timesheets for client projects and employees as well as some funky analysis of payment history.

Feature-for-feature, Invotrak and Freshbooks seem almost identical, though the latter offers a wider range of price plans, the former does seem to enjoy a cleaner and clearer design.

However, perhaps the ace-in-the-hole for Invotrak is its support for the iPhone, via a native App Store application, and its availability as a Dashboard widget for Macs.

Released early last month, the iPhone edition of Invotrak is available for no charge – though users must still be registered and subscribed to one of the company’s plans. The app offers many of the functions of its parent web application, notably the ability  to track invoices and and payments, but also more handily (for a mobile context) the ability to look up stored information about your clients.

invotrakiphoneCoupled with the desktop widget and iPhone app, Invotrak has set a couple of interesting precedents for dry services such as invoice management. By mobilizing and widgetizing the activity of invoicing, something that’s a dull, boring, last-minute or once-monthly task can now be completed ad-hoc through various means of access, suggesting that many other such productivity applications could be enhanced by mobility and widgetization.

Feature-wise, Freshbooks appears to be a stronger package, but Invotrak offers an interesting alternative for those who require flexbility rather than feature-complete services.

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