Summary:

We’ve looked at note organizer Evernote before, and liked what we saw. Th combination of desktop and web clients, text recognition, and the promise of universal information availability, make it very useful as a general-purpose place to store, well, everything. A new feature, introduced just in […]

evernoteWe’ve looked at note organizer Evernote before, and liked what we saw. Th combination of desktop and web clients, text recognition, and the promise of universal information availability, make it very useful as a general-purpose place to store, well, everything. A new feature, introduced just in time for Christmas, makes it even more useful: universal file synchronization.

Evernote already synchronized copies of its own notes across as many installations as you cared to have – Windows, Web, Mac, or mobile. But attachment synchronization was limited to a few file types that it natively understands, such as images and audio. Now, you can attach any file you like to a note, and have that file transported to every installation, as well as available through the web interface.Attached documents can be edited directly from Evernote, and changes will be synched back to all of your copies (with warnings of conflicting changes). The new feature is available only to Evernote Premium subscribers, who pay $5 per month or $45 per year for the privilege. But if you’re already using some other utility to share files between your various computers, it’s worth looking at whether you can make Evernote both your note-taking and your sharing application.

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