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Summary:

The Wall Street Journal talked to many people to find out where companies would be spending their precious dollars in 2009. Here is a quick look at what may sell in 2009: Software as a Service: Today 10 percent of total software sales come from on-demand […]

The Wall Street Journal talked to many people to find out where companies would be spending their precious dollars in 2009. Here is a quick look at what may sell in 2009:

Software as a Service: Today 10 percent of total software sales come from on-demand software. Expect that number to rise as penny-pinching CEOs finally realize that SaaS is good for the bottom line. Even Larry Ellison, Oracle’s CEO, has changed his tune about SaaS.

Mobile Productivity Apps: Thanks to the success of Apple’s iTunes Apps store, many companies are toying with mobile apps that will help increase productivity. The upcoming BlackBerry Apps store is going to give this mobile-productivity trend a push.

Security: Email spam was the worst offender, hitting an all-time high in 2008. With malware and phishing attacks becoming routine and virus attacks on computers more common than flu outbreaks, it’s only natural that security would eat up a big part of corporate IT budgets.

Photo courtesy of Natalie Maynor via Flickr.

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  1. Agree, consumer Internet could face hard time ahead, sell something bring real value to customers

  2. Vendors targeting their products and services on making employees more productive while helping companies stretch what few budget dollars they have, will lead the recovery.

  3. That’s kind of funny that LE has changed his tune considering that SaaS is a relative of Cloud Computing. Dumbass.

  4. I couldn’t agree more! Glad to be in the SaaS industry.

    http://twitter.com/tjbaudanza

  5. December 23, 2008 | next media update Wednesday, December 24, 2008

    [...] What Will Sell in 2009? SaaS, Mobile Apps & Security GIGAOM The Wall Street Journal talked to many people to find out where companies would be spending their precious dollars in 2009. Here is a quick look at what may sell in 2009: Software as a Service: Today 10 percent of total software sales come from on-demand software. Expect that number to rise as penny-pinching CEOs finally realize that SaaS is good for the bottom line. Even Larry Ellison, Oracle’s CEO, has changed his tune about SaaS. Mobile Productivity Apps: Thanks to the success of Apple’s iTunes Apps store, many companies are toying with mobile apps that will help increase productivity. The upcoming BlackBerry Apps store is going to give this mobile-productivity trend a push. Source> [...]

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  9. One of the problems that the small SaaS application providers encounter is how to manage the billing and customers for providing the service. A lot of energy (read R&D spending) goes into developing the billing and mediation software. While researching, I came across a company called eVapt.com who have done an incredible job of developing the software that can integrate with your legacy CRM solutions and enable you to not only speed up roll out of SaaS but also to predict which customers would make renew contracts and helps a lot in contract and customer management. With the help of such softwares, I am sure SaaS will gain a fast popularity and break the myths about compromising with the organization security.

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