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Summary:

Whether the (unofficial) Google Phone, a.k.a. the T-Mobile G-1, is going to set sales records or not, remains to be seen. But Google is doing its part. My source says that on Friday, the Mountain View, Calif.-based search and online advertising company gave away a special […]

Whether the (unofficial) Google Phone, a.k.a. the T-Mobile G-1, is going to set sales records or not, remains to be seen. But Google is doing its part. My source says that on Friday, the Mountain View, Calif.-based search and online advertising company gave away a special unlocked version of the Android-powered G-1 device (with an Android logo etched on its back) to its employees. It’s nice for more people to get familiar with a device that represents a big part of the company’s future. In related news, there has been some talk about a new G-2 version of the device. (Related Post: What I Love & Hate About T-Mobile G-1.)

  1. Is Google’s phone really growing up?
    Until now, it hasn’t been heavy and slow…

  2. Rich Apps Consulting Monday, December 22, 2008

    what is the launch date for G-2?

  3. Odd – The “Android Dev Phone 1″ handset doesn’t support North American 3G (1700/2100 MHz). Why would Google employees want slow azz EDGE phones?

    http://code.google.com/android/dev-devices.html

  4. Google Can Do Big, Just Not Small : Beyond Search Monday, December 22, 2008

    [...] Unlocked G-1 Phones” interesting because carriers want lock in. You can read this item here. From my point of view, there is nothing very surprising to me with Google’s pushing button A [...]

  5. I love my G1, got it the day it came out. As a HTC fanboi who has owned dozens of HTC phones (I recommend phones for my high end clientele, so buying a new phone often is a business investment), I think this is HTC’s triumph so far.

    The downsides: The RC30 update can’t be jailbroken yet, so I’m a bit miffed about that. The tethering app is horrible, but at least it works, sort of. I still keep my HTC Trinity P3600 with my AT&T 3G tethering plan for WiFi on the go (works great). There are some bugs in the web browser, still, that Google refuses to acknowledge but make my life a bit difficult.

    The upsides: the phone works. Battery life is a non-issue since I always have a USB port somewhere (dashboard of the car, desk, home, wherever). If only bars would start putting USB ports on the bar top, I could charge while I drink my Aberlour. Otherwise, the phone is just fantastic.

    If T-Mobile/Google wishes to release a phone without a hard keyboard, so be it. I’m not in a rush until I’ve seen what developers can REALLY do with the app code interface. It just gets better and better every week it seems.

    My iPhone, used for about 6 hours, is still in my desk. I should sell the POS, and hope that Apple really does release a Newton-like “phone” device.

  6. Jesse Kopelman Monday, December 22, 2008

    @Todd

    Only T-Mobile uses 1700/2100 for 3G. AT&T uses 800/1900 for its 3G network.

  7. Sim Only Contract Deals Wednesday, December 24, 2008

    It would be a good phone, maybe even revolutionary with the Android operating system but I dont think it will be selling like the iPhone did on release. The iPhone I think was a good follow up from the popular iPods. I would like to see somebody do a close comparison between the G1 mobile phone and the Nokia N97

  8. Google have done what they do best and provide a simple and easy to use software combined with the practical and business-style design of HTC. However, the iPhone still rules in terms of design, sexiness and style. There are still features like copy and paste that you can’t do on the iphone but if you want a phone that is fashinable then go for that instead of the G1.

  9. Google’s android phone, really I think its great. I have the I phone but somehow I am very disappointed about the thing. There is some lack of usability and I think Google will fix this.

  10. Vodacom is set to launch the Android based HTC Magic, aka Google G2, in South Africa

    The HTC Magic was first unveiled in mid-February at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona and was commercially available in Europe in late April and early May. Vodafone has exclusive rights to the HTC Magic, and it is through this agreement that Vodacom could bring the latest Google phone to South Africa.

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