Summary:

UN Climate Chief Calls Progress in Poznan Too Slow for Comprehensive Treaty in ’09: Delegates from 190 countries at the UN’s climate talks in Poznan, Poland this week planned to sign a treaty at a conference in Copenhagen next year, finalizing an agreement to reduce greenhouse-gas […]

UN Climate Chief Calls Progress in Poznan Too Slow for Comprehensive Treaty in ’09: Delegates from 190 countries at the UN’s climate talks in Poznan, Poland this week planned to sign a treaty at a conference in Copenhagen next year, finalizing an agreement to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions. The UN’s top climate change official told reporters this week he thinks negotiations are not moving quickly enough for delegates to reach a “fully elaborate and comprehensive agreement” by then. — Bloomberg

One $15B Automaker Bailout, Coming Right Up: Congressional Democrats delivered a draft of a $15 billion bailout plan for the auto industry to the White House yesterday afternoon. Officials there said work remains to ensure financing goes only to automakers with credible plans for long-term viability. Negotiations are drawing to a close, however, and Congress will most likely vote on the package this week. — New York Times

Honda, Nissan, Toyota Execs Call Car Tech Game Wide Open: If you think the future of the auto industry belongs to the makers of today’s fuel-sippers, think again, say executives from Japan’s top three car companies. From Honda: “Sure, there’s all kinds of hype about electric vehicles and hybrids and fuel-cell cars, but no one has the breakthrough technology to bring them into the mainstream.” — Reuters

How Carbon-Footprint Reduction Services Really Work: Carbopposites, self-organized worldwide concert events, and Amazon tree-plantings based on your lifestyle data are all part of the carbon-offset process recently illuminated by “America’s Finest News Source.” — The Onion

Picture This — Floating Offshore Wind Power Platforms: Researchers at MIT and elsewhere are investigating oil-rig-inspired “tension-leg” platforms for wind turbines. Norway-based SWAY has a prototype for a spar buoy platform that requires less anchoring than the tension-leg option. Can’t picture it? No problem: This post is peppered with informative illustrations. — The Oil Drum

Comments have been disabled for this post